Are you an avid movie buff, or a hardcore gamer? Do you own a HDTV and enjoy a high definition experience? Microsoft Research aims to further enhance your visual pleasure when watching the screen with IllumiRoom - a concept that uses peripheral projected illusions for interactive experiences. Forget 3D glasses, this involves subtle projections without any potential eye-strain.

The proof-of-concept system augments the environment where the television is situated with projected visualisations to enhance traditional viewing experiences. IllumiRoom uses a Kinect for Windows camera and a projector to blur the lines between on-screen content and the environment in attempt to combine the virtual and physical elements together.

The system can alter the appearance of the room, induce apparent motion, extend the field of view and enable entirely new video gaming experiences. Checking out the above video walkthrough will illustrate some of the functionality of IllumiRoom at work with Xbox titles making use of the new real estate.

IllumiRoom uses the geometry of the room (captured by Kinect) to adapt the projected visuals in real-time without the requirement for custom pre-process of the graphics. The footage in the video demonstration is captured in its entirety with no post-production effects. Microsoft is already working hard to take video gaming to the next level, and IllumiRoom could fit right in.

UllumiRoom

Imagine a potential future where you can not only speak to the console, see yourself on-screen in an augmented reality, but also have the environment used to extend the field of view in videos games, providing even more detail for the viewer to take in each second. Doors are also opened up to adapting said environment to cater for different gameplay - hosted events could construct specific rooms for different video game types or titles to immerse the attendee into the experience.

The possibilities with this technology are exciting. We'll attempt to take a peek at the project which has made an appearance at CES 2013.

Source: Microsoft, YouTube