How to disable automatic repair on Windows 10

On Windows 10, automatic repair is a handy feature that troubleshoots and fixes common problems that may be preventing your device from loading correctly.

If your computer fails to start two consecutive times, in the third boot the self-repair mechanism will trigger, and during this process, the system will run a number of diagnostic tests to detect and repair common startup problems.

However, if you would rather troubleshoot and fix startup problems manually, or the automatic repair is causing unexpected loops, it's possible to disable the feature on Windows 10.

In this Windows 10 guide, we walk you through the steps to disable automatic diagnose and repair on your device. In addition, if automatic repair was previously disabled, or you want to revert the changes, we also outline the steps to re-enable the feature.

How to disable automatic repair on Windows 10

To disable automatic repair during the third unsuccessful boot of Windows 10, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Search for Command Prompt, right-click the top result, and select Run as administrator.
  3. Type the following command and press Enter:bcdedit
  4. Make note of the reoveryenabled and identifier values under the "Windows Boot Loader" section. The values should be similar to these:
    • identifier: {current}
    • recoveryenabled: yes

  1. Type the following command to disable automatic repair and press Enter:bcdedit /set {current} recoveryenabled no
    • In the command, we're using {current} to specify the target OS option in the boot loader and the no value to disable the automatic repair.

Once you complete these steps, the diagnostic and repair feature will no longer run automatically after the third unsuccessful boot of your device.

How to enable automatic repair on Windows 10

If the automatic repair feature is disabled, you can use these steps to re-enable it:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Search for Command Prompt, right-click the top result, and select Run as administrator.
  3. Type the following command and press Enter:bcdedit
  4. Make note of the reoveryenabled and identifier values under the "Windows Boot Loader" section. The values should be similar to these:
    • identifier: {current}
    • recoveryenabled: no

  1. Type the following command to enable automatic repair and press Enter:bcdedit /set {current} recoveryenabled yes

  • In the command, we're using {current} to specify the target OS option in the boot loader and the yes value to enable automatic repair again.

After completing these steps, if you're having issues starting Windows 10, as you try to boot your device a third time, the system will proceed to diagnose your device, and it'll try to repair common issues that may prevent the OS from loading correctly.

More Windows 10 resources

For more helpful articles, coverage, and answers to common questions about Windows 10, visit the following resources:

Mauro Huculak is technical writer for WindowsCentral.com. His primary focus is to write comprehensive how-tos to help users get the most out of Windows 10 and its many related technologies. He has an IT background with professional certifications from Microsoft, Cisco, and CompTIA, and he's a recognized member of the Microsoft MVP community.

1 Comment
  • In the article above the instructions tell me to look for: identifier: {default} Yet, even in the accompanying picture, the actual value is: identifier: {current} On my PC, which was upgraded from Windows 8.1 to 10, I have two separate sections of settings, one labeled "Windows Boot Manager" and the other is "Windows Boot Loader". The values I need to look at are in the latter. My "identifier" value is "{current}" not "{default}". I know giving people advice on Windows is complex. It is pretty easy to assume that your PC is representative of all Windows computers. That's just not so. The article is incomplete and inaccurate. I would suggest: From an elevated command prompt (if you don't know what this is then you shouldn't be doing this), run the command: bcdedit In the resulting output, look for a section titled: Windows Boot Loader The first item should be "identifier" and might have a value of "{default}" or "{current}". Note what it is for the following. You can now change the "recoveryenabled" item to "yes" or "no" to enable or disable the feature: bcdedit /set {current} recoveryenabled no Or: bcdedit /set {current} recoveryenabled yes Substitute YOUR value for "{current}". Thanks for your attention. Film@11