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PC gamers have a new way to control their PC with Tobii Eye Tracker 5

Tobii Eye Tracker 5 Lifestyle
Tobii Eye Tracker 5 Lifestyle (Image credit: Tobii)

What you need to know

  • Tobii announced the Tobii Eye Tracker 5.
  • The device is designed for gamers and is quicker and more responsive than previous generations.
  • The Tobii Eye Tracker 5 is available for $229 from Tobii.

Tobii announced the Tobii Eye Tracker 5 today, an eye tracking device built specifically for gamers. The Tobii Eye Tracker 5 is the sequel to the Tobii Eye Tracker 4C and delivers quicker and more responsive eye tracking. The Tobii Eye Tracker 5 is available starting today for $229.

In addition to being quicker and more responsive, the Tobii Eye Tracker 5 features improved head tracking and a new universal mount to fit more screen types. In its announcement post, Anand Srivatsa, Division CEO of Tobii Tech, states, "We are thrilled to launch Tobii Eye Tracker 5, which is designed specifically for gamers who aim to level up their game performance, improve their game experience, or improve the content they stream." Srivatsa adds "The enhancements in speed, responsiveness and head-tracking accuracy will benefit all types of gamers and should be particularly useful within esports and simulation games."

Tobii Eye Tracking works with over 150 games, including Tom Clancy's The Division 2, Assassin's Creed Odyssey, and Shadow of the Tomb Raider.

In addition to helping people control games and their PCs, the Tobii Eye Tracker 5 can be used for training. You can use the device to study analytics such as tunnel vision, awareness, and focus to improve your gaming. You can also use the Tobii Eye Tracker 5 to engage with stream viewers by sharing eye movement insights.

Sean Endicott
News Writer and apps editor

Sean Endicott brings nearly a decade of experience covering Microsoft and Windows news to Windows Central. He joined our team in 2017 as an app reviewer and now heads up our day-to-day news coverage. If you have a news tip or an app to review, hit him up at sean.endicott@futurenet.com (opens in new tab).

1 Comment
  • I'd buy this but I'd feel bad that I'm using a tool that should go to someone with a real disability. Still, tech eventually trickles down and some day this will be more widespread. Kudos to MS for incorporating it as OS level. MS cares about people with disabilities.