Here's what you need to know about Microsoft's next Xbox console – the Xbox One X.

A whole year after its first teaser, Microsoft has officially unveiled its next flagship games console, the Xbox One X. As previously announced under the codename "Project Scorpio," the Xbox One X is a premium device, which targets console gamers aiming for high performance. We've rounded up the biggest questions following its reveal, with information to get hands-on as soon as possible.

What is the Xbox One X?

The Xbox One X is an updated version of the Xbox One, which promises to deliver a premium gaming experience. Microsoft is hoping to offer 4K UHD resolution, 60 frames per second (FPS) and high dynamic range (HDR) for games running on the console, as a result of the significant leap in computing power.

With these hardware improvements, this positions the Xbox One X as the most powerful console currently on the market. However, unlike previous upgrades within the Xbox lineup – the Xbox One X remains a part of the Xbox One family. The device is still an Xbox One at its core – only with some major hardware improvements.

What are the Xbox One X technical specs?

The Xbox One X is powered by eight CPU cores clocked at 2.3GHz, 12GB of GDDR5 RAM and a GPU packing 40 Radeon compute units running at 1172 MHz. Overall, the console's six teraflops of graphical processing power far exceed its competitors on the market, making for a high-end (and costly) device. Click the link below for a full in-depth breakdown of the Xbox One X's technical specs.

Do I need a 4K TV to take advantage of Xbox One X?

Mostly. To see the benefit of gaming running at resolutions above 1080p, you'll need a 4K television. A fair portion of the Xbox One X's library will aim to hit 4K resolution on the console, but that's not to say those on full HD displays will be entirely excluded.

Games with 4K assets will leverage supersampling to produce a smoother image even on 1080p screens. Additionally, games that use dynamic resolution scaling should look nicer on Xbox One X, hitting their target resolutions and frame rates more often than they might on the standard Xbox One's hardware.

Which games will take advantage of Xbox One X?

To take full of the Xbox One X's hardware, a majority of games will have to be manually patched to offer high resolutions, framerates, and textures. It remains to be seen just how many titles will get patches to support the Xbox One X's hardware, but looking at the games showcased at Microsoft's E3 2017 press conference – a number of third-parties are already jumping onboard.

As for patched games on Xbox One X, you can expect gameplay to run smoother and look nicer. They can take advantage of advanced anti-aliasing techniques, higher quality shadows, lighting, and of course, resolution. Other improvements may include fast-loading textures, sharper scenery and a higher density of foliage. Ultimately, the significance of these improvements will come down to the developer, but the additional resources should make for some noteworthy changes.

How much does the Xbox One X cost?

The Xbox One X will start at $499, for the base model sporting a 1TB hard drive. It's looking like other versions of the console will be available with larger hard drives, however, these are yet to be announced.

When does the Xbox One X launch?

The Xbox One X will be available later this year, on November 7, 2017. Although the console's launch regions are yet to be specified, we can expect a similar rollout to that seen with the Xbox One S.

Where can I order an Xbox One X?

The Xbox One X will soon be available for preorder at most video games retailers. While there's still a few months until the console's debut, we recommend reserving a console once preorders go live if you're hoping to pick one up on launch day. As with any anticipated hardware release, there's a chance these will be in short supply for the first few weeks of hitting store shelves.

Microsoft has also begun to rollout pricing and availability outside of the United States, with a £449 starting price in the UK and €499 in Europe.