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The Xbox Red Ring of Death is back, this time in the form of a commemorative poster

Xbox 360 Vertical
Xbox 360 Vertical (Image credit: Windows Central)

What you need to know

  • Microsoft recently launched a six-part documentary covering the history of the Xbox brand.
  • To commemorate the release of the series, Microsoft is selling posters with images inspired by the history of Xbox.
  • One of the posters features the infamous Xbox Red Ring of Death.

Microsoft's new documentary, Power-On, details the history of the Xbox brand. The series covers the ups and downs of the last two decades, including the decision to make the original Xbox and the failings of the Xbox One focusing on TV. It provides a look behind the curtain of the Xbox team, and Microsoft decided to commemorate the series with a collection of posters. There are seven posters in all, including one that features the Xbox Red Ring of Death.

While the infamous Red Ring of Death caused frustration for many console owners, it is undoubtedly part of the history of the Xbox family of devices. The initial batch of Xbox 360 consoles had a high failure rate, and a variety of errors were indicated by three red LEDs lighting up. While the situation improved, issues persisted throughout the lifecycle of the Xbox 360.

The fifth chapter of Power-On covers the saga of the red ring. "By the time we looked at the cost of repairs, the lost sales that we factored in, we had a $1.15 billion problem," said former Xbox chief Peter Moore.

Gamers interested in remembering the Red Ring of Death can purchase a poster from Microsoft for $25. There are also posters available inspired by the Valentine's Day Massacre (a senior leadership meeting held by Microsoft to discuss the Xbox) and Microsoft's decision to bundle the Xbox One with the Kinect.

Many of the Power-On chapters focus on negative periods in the history of Xbox. This approach makes the documentary series interesting and also inspires some unique posters.

All of the Power-On posters cost $25. They're 0.25 mm thick and are made of slightly glossy paper that's fingerprint-resistant.

Sean Endicott
Sean Endicott

Sean Endicott is the news writer for Windows Central. If it runs Windows, is made by Microsoft, or has anything to do with either, he's on it. Sean's been with Windows Central since 2017 and is also our resident app expert. If you have a news tip or an app to review, hit him up at sean.endicott@futurenet.com.