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be quiet! Dark Power Pro 12
be quiet! Dark Power Pro 12 (Image credit: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central)

To get the most out of the AMD Radeon RX 6900 XT GPU, you'll need a capable power supply (PSU). Luckily, AMD doesn't have obscene power requirements for one of its best graphics cards, meaning you should be able to use plenty of PSUs with this GPU and not encounter any performance or stability issues. We rounded up a few of our favorites if you need any ideas.

Choosing the best PSU for AMD Radeon RX 6900 XT

When selecting the best PSU for your AMD Radeon RX 6900 XT GPU, you need to bear a few things in mind. Firstly, for single-card use (as in you only have a single GPU in use), it's best to have a PSU with a capacity of at least 500W. For the Radeon RX 6900 XT, we'd bump this up to 600W, especially if you plan on using power-hungry CPUs like the Ryzen 9 3900X.

80 Plus certification isn't a must but does help with efficiency. Anything at Gold or above tends to be the sweet spot for PC builds, though if you're on a tight budget, a Silver or White certified PSU would do just fine. Make sure the PSU is from a reputable brand, and you'll be in safe hands. The last thing you want to do is kill the rest of your components for saving a little too much on power delivery.

Our top recommendation for the Radeon RX 6900 XT goes to the Corsair CM 650x (opens in new tab). It's well-priced, is certified for 80 Plus Gold and comes with a 10-year warranty. It'll provide stable, reliable power to your GPU and all other PC components.

If you have more money than you know what to do with, the be quiet! Dark Power Pro 12 (opens in new tab) is a solid option for a high-end or enthusiast PC build. With 1200W of power (there's a 1500W option (opens in new tab) too!), you've got everything you need for a powerful gaming rig.

Rich Edmonds
Rich Edmonds

Rich Edmonds is Senior Editor of PC hardware at Windows Central, covering everything related to PC components and NAS. He's been involved in technology for more than a decade and knows a thing or two about the magic inside a PC chassis. You can follow him over on Twitter at @RichEdmonds.