HP’s brand-new Spectre x360 16” is now just $935. You read that right.

Hp Spectre X360 16 2022
(Image credit: Daniel Rubino | Windows Central)

When it comes to the best Black Friday and Cyber Monday laptop deals this HP Spectre x360 16-inch (16t-f100) must be near the top. 

Normally costing $1,650, this new 2022 laptop is on sale for $1,050. But, if you add in coupon STOCKING10 during checkout, the price drops below $1,000 to just $935.

What’s the catch?

There isn’t one.

For this configuration, the Spectre ships with a gorgeous 16-inch, 3K+ (3072 x 1920), multitouch-enabled, IPS, Low Blue Light, 400 nit display. Yeah, it’s not full HD non-touch or some low-end spec. It also has razor thin bezels with a 91% screen-to-body-ratio. Hello!

HP Spectre x360 16-inch (16t-f100) $1,650 (opens in new tab)

HP Spectre x360 16-inch (16t-f100) $1,650 $1,050 $935 at HP.com (opens in new tab)

HP's new 2022 16" convertible laptop has a drool-worthy 3K+ touch display, included pen, and a powerful H-series 12th Gen Core i7 processor. The audio is also insanely good as is the industry-leading 5MP webcam. 

The processor is no slouch either as it’s an Intel 12th Gen Core i7-12700H (4.7GHz) with a whopping 14 cores and 20 threads. That’s the “big boi” laptop processor denoting the 45W power usage and it’s usually found in workstations and gaming laptops.

But 8GB of RAM, right? Nope. It has 16GB LPDDR 4 and a fast and large 512GB PCIe SSD.

The one thing this model doesn’t have is a discrete GPU. Instead, you’re getting native Intel Iris Xe (you can configure this laptop with an Intel Arc A370M graphics card with 32GB of RAM if you want).

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Row 0 - Cell 0 HP Spectre x360 16
OSWindows 11 Home/Pro
Processor12th Gen Intel
Row 3 - Cell 0 Core i7-12700H
Row 4 - Cell 0 Core i5-1260P
GraphicsIntel Iris Xe, Arc A370M
MemoryUp to 32GB DDR4-3200 MHz
Storage512GB, 1TB, 2TB M.2 PCIe 4.0 SSD
Display16-inches, 16:10 aspect ratio
Row 9 - Cell 0 Touch, Corning Gorilla Glass
Row 10 - Cell 0 3072x1920, AR, IPS, 400 nits, 100% sRGB
Row 11 - Cell 0 3072x1920, IPS, 400 nits, 100% sRGB
Row 12 - Cell 0 3840x2400, OLED, AR, HDR500 (400 nits)
PenHP Rechargeable MPP 2.0 Tilt
PortsTwo Thunderbolt 4, one Type-A, one HDMI 2.1, one headphone/mic combo, one microSD reader
AudioAudio by Bang & Olufsen
Row 16 - Cell 0 Quad speakers
WirelessIntel Wi-Fi 6E AX211, Bluetooth 5.2
CameraHP True Vision 5MP IR camera with camera shutter
Battery6-cell, 83Wh
Dimensions14.09 (W) x 9.66 (D) x 0.78 (H) in
Row 21 - Cell 0 358 x 245 x 19.8 mm
Weight4.45lbs (2.01kg)
ColorNightfall Black with Pale Brass accents; Nocturne Blue with Celestial Blue accents
AvailabilityMay 19, 2022
PriceFrom $1,650

The uptick to Iris Xe graphics is two-fold: One, you get that sub $1,000 price, and two, you’re going to get better battery life. Basically, this is a laptop ideal for those who want a large, high-quality, high-resolution display, and an immensely powerful CPU. It should be great for photo editing, working in Microsoft Office, and definitely watching movies and videos.

One of the highlights, from personal experience, is also HP’s fantastic 5MP webcam, which is one of the best I have used. It’s sharp, has vibrant colors, can blur your background, and does HDR making this perfect for meetings and those who video conference often.

And the best part? This is an x360 laptop, so it can convert to a tablet for inking, and you do get the HP Rechargeable MPP2.0 Tilt Pen right in the box, so you can draw and take notes on day one.

For ports, you get all the good ones including two Thunderbolt 4, one Type-A, HDMI 2.1, a headphone/mic jack, and even a microSD card reader. There is also Bluetooth 5.2 and Intel Wi-Fi 6E, which is the latest and greatest.

There is also a massive 83WHr battery, so you should be good for most of the day.

Overall, this is one excellent-looking laptop and for $935 you are getting a lot of computer. Why believe me? I reviewed the higher-end version just a few months ago. Don’t pass this one up.

Daniel Rubino
Editor-in-chief

Daniel Rubino is the Editor-in-chief of Windows Central, head reviewer, podcast co-host, and analyst. He has been covering Microsoft since 2007 when this site was called WMExperts (and later Windows Phone Central). His interests include Windows, laptops, next-gen computing, and for some reason, watches. Before all this tech stuff, he worked on a Ph.D. in linguistics, watched people sleep (for medical purposes!), and ran the projectors at movie theaters because it was fun.