Is AMD Ryzen 5 2600 a good CPU for Fortnite?

AMD Ryzen 5 2600
AMD Ryzen 5 2600 (Image credit: Windows Central)

Is AMD Ryzen 5 2600 a good CPU for Fortnite?

Best answer: AMD's Ryzen 5 2600 is an excellent mid-range CPU, perfect for gaming and Fortnite.Amazon: AMD Ryzen 5 2600 CPU (opens in new tab) ($160)Amazon: ASUS GTX 1060 GPU (opens in new tab) ($250)

Six cores / 12 threads

The number of cores and threads may not mean much, but think of them as a highway. A vehicle is a task assigned to the processor to handle. A core has two threads, which you can consider as highway lanes. Twelve lanes allow you to cram down more vehicles before bottlenecks occur.

Having 12 threads allows the processor to handle multiple tasks at once, ideal for games that support multi-core setups. Fortnite isn't the most multi-core supported game out there, but it doesn't hurt to have the available performance at hand, especially if you play other games and do some work on the side too.

An added bonus with this CPU is the inclusion of a stock cooler that's actually decent enough for keeping the processor within safe operating temperatures without sounding like a jet engine.

Dropping from the bus

Throw in a GTX 1060 or higher GPU with the Ryzen 5 2600 and you'll have an extremely capable gaming rig, all without overclocking. You'll surpass the recommended PC requirements for Fortnite, which include:

  • CPU: Intel Core i5 2.8GHz or AMD equivalent.
  • RAM: 8GB.
  • GPU: NVIDIA GTX 660 or AMD Radeon HD 7870 (DX11 GPU).

Using the AMD Ryzen 5 2600 with a GTX 1060 will allow you to play Fortnite in 1080p at 60 FPS easily. Step it up to a GTX 1070 and you can move to a 1440p monitor with a refresh rate of 144Hz. And have a look at more best graphics card picks if you need more power.

Rich Edmonds
Senior Editor, PC Build

Rich Edmonds is Senior Editor of PC hardware at Windows Central, covering everything related to PC components and NAS. He's been involved in technology for more than a decade and knows a thing or two about the magic inside a PC chassis. You can follow him over on Twitter at @RichEdmonds.