How to display last sign-in information during logon on Windows 10

Windows 10 comes with a lot of security features to keep your account and data safe from prying eyes. You get features like your standard password protection, two-factor authentication when using a Microsoft account, and you can even use a PIN as a secondary method of authentication, which you can make very hard to crack, just to name a few.

However, even with all the security features that the operating system has to offer, if you're sharing your PC or you're in a place where other people may have physical access to your device, there is not an easy way to tell if someone gained access to your computer.

Fortunately, on Windows 10 using a local account, you can view if someone successfully signed in to your PC (and failed attempts), which can help to determine if you need to yell at someone for trying to access your PC without authorization and if you have to reinforce your device security.

In this Windows 10 guide, we'll walk you through the steps to use the Local Group Policy Editor and the Registry to display the last sign-in information and failed attempts to your account since the last interactive logon.

How to display last sign-in information using Local Group Policy

If you're running Windows 10 Pro, Enterprise, or Education, you can use the Local Group Policy Editor to quickly enable a policy to display the last sign-in information during logon.

To view the previous sign-in information and unsuccessful attempts, do the following:

  1. Use the Windows key + R keyboard shortcut to open the Run command.
  2. Type gpedit.msc and click OK to open the Local Group Policy Editor.
  3. Browse the following path:Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > Windows Components > Windows Logon Options
  4. On the right side, double-click the Display information about previous logons during user logon policy.

  1. On the top-left, make sure to select Enabled to enforce the policy.
  2. Click Apply.
  3. Click OK to complete the task.

At any time you can revert the changes by following the same steps, but this time on step 5, you'll need to select the Not Configured option.

How to display last sign-in information using the Registry

In the case your computer is running Windows 10 Home, you won't have access to the Local Group Policy Editor, but if you're up to the challenge, you can tweak the Registry to achieve the same result.

Important: As always, this is a friendly reminder to let you know that editing the registry is risky, and it can cause irreversible damage to your installation if you don't do it correctly. It's recommended to make a full backup of your PC before proceeding.

  1. Use the Windows key + R keyboard shortcut to open the Run command.
  2. Type regedit, and click OK to open the registry.
  3. Browse the following path:HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System
  4. Select the System (folder) key, and right-click on the right side, select New, and click on DWORD (32-bit) Value.

  1. Name the new DWORD DisplayLastLogonInfo and press Enter.
  2. Double-click the newly created DWORD and change its value from 0 to 1.

  1. Close the Registry to complete the task.

If you're tweaking the Registry, you can revert the changes by following the same steps, but this time on step 6 change the DWORD value from 1 to 0.

Once you completed the steps, you can restart your computer, and when you sign back in to your local account, you'll now see a first message about interactively signing in to your computer.

Then during the second time and moving forward, you'll see the previous logon information (see image above).

Wrapping things up

While this won't prevent other people from trying to access your computer, now you have at least one way to review if someone broke into your local account or if anyone tried to guess your password but failed in the process.

Keep in mind that even though we're focusing this guide for Windows 10, displaying the previous sign-in information during logon is a feature that has been around for a long time, which means that this should also work in Windows 7 and Windows 8.1.

More Windows 10 resources

For more help articles, coverage, and answers on Windows 10, you can visit the following resources:

Mauro Huculak is technical writer for WindowsCentral.com. His primary focus is to write comprehensive how-tos to help users get the most out of Windows 10 and its many related technologies. He has an IT background with professional certifications from Microsoft, Cisco, and CompTIA, and he's a recognized member of the Microsoft MVP community.

17 Comments
  • Thanks, I was just looking for something like this the other day.
  • sweet, totally in control
  • Didn't know such thing exists until now, a big thanks. Btw, why doesn't msft add this kind of options in Settings?
  • Because there are just too many settings, it would just take a long time to for MS to bring these features to Control Panel/Settings. Thanks,
  • I'd like to think of it as a piece of cake for msft. It seems they're already halfway there in the process of moving the Control Panel package to the Settings on Windows 10. Some ppl just don't bother to look at the settings until they begin to dislike something that's going on with their PC by default, some ppl crave for deep customization. I always take myself a tour into Settings whenever there's a major update is installed. These simple and effective features should be in Settings Imo, if not for deep (hypothetical) registry edits that can give notable features bundled with problems.
  • Yeah I understand what you're saying and also every time wc writes one of these how to articles, someone always says it should be a setting. It's difficult balance to allow different customization/options and not overdoing it. They kind of have to go the "average" route, which is what does the average person need to be able to do and prioritize from there. If they had all the infinite time I'm sure all options would be available.
  • Yeah, many of these settings are not relevant to most users anyways nor they care. This is why this many of the IT features is not even on Control Panel or Settings but under one of these MMC windows.
  • Well actually this is quite visible setting under Group Policy Editor which is used in IT environments. Though of course this feature only available from Pro and above. Home generally don't use Group Policy, so the setting is not even visible unless you fiddle around the Registry. Though this particular feature, actually I agree that this would be nice to have a checkbox on Settings. I actually do wish Group Policy to have a UI refresh just to at least make it bit more modern and organized, also touch friendly so I can use it we'll on tablets. Again it doesn't have to be UWP when there isn't much benefit of doing so, especially risking stability, reliability and the possibility of some stuff missing or buggy.
  • Well actually this is quite visible setting under Group Policy Editor which is used in IT environments. Though of course this feature only available from Pro and above. Home generally don't use Group Policy, so the setting is not even visible unless you fiddle around the Registry. Though this particular feature, actually I agree that this would be nice to have a checkbox on Settings. I actually do wish Group Policy to have a UI refresh just to at least make it bit more modern and organized, also touch friendly so I can use it we'll on tablets. Again it doesn't have to be UWP when there isn't much benefit of doing so, especially risking stability, reliability and the possibility of some stuff missing or buggy.
  • Windows 10 ..... RULE THE TECH
  • Does it work using ms accounts? Article states local accounts specifically, will give it a try anyway
  • I think you can see login attempts at the Microsoft account website. For all devices you are signed in on. Only for failed attempts, I believe.
  • You can only use this with a local account. For some reason, the only account options you can use with a Microsoft account are those you can configure on your account online. Thanks,
  • Still prefer the control panel.
    A lite Group Policy Editor, would be nice for home versions
  • Thank you.
  • I'm using Windows 10, slow ring, and the regedit way does no work.
  • In a domain environment that has not had the domain set up for this will lock you out.  The workaround to fix it back is to disconnect from the network and login with cached credentials, reset the Group Policy, then attach back to the network.