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How to opt-out the Customer Experience Improvement Program on Windows 10

The Customer Experience Improvement Program (CEIP) is a feature that comes enabled by default on Windows 10, and it secretly collects and submits system information to Microsoft. The information that the feature collects includes hardware configuration and how you use the operating system and other products, which helps the company to improve the quality of future releases.

Although Microsoft ensures that the program doesn't collect your personal information, there isn't a way to verify the exact information your device sends out. If you feel this is a privacy concern or you simply are not interested in participating, you should consider turning off this feature.

While Windows 10 doesn't include an option to opt-out completely of the program, you can use the Local Group Policy Editor or the Registry to turn off the Customer Experience Improvement Program on your PC. Using these tools, you'll stop Microsoft from collecting hardware configuration and software usage while saving a few bits of internet data in the process.

In this Windows 10 guide, we'll walk you through the steps to stop Microsoft from collecting system information and usage patterns from your computer using the Local Group Policy Editor and the Registry.

How to stop the Customer Experience Improvement Program using Group Policy

If you're running Windows 10 Pro or a higher version, you can use the Local Group Policy Editor to quickly turn off the Customer Experience Improvement program on your computer.

To disable the Customer Experience Improvement Program, do the following:

  1. Use the Windows key + R keyboard shortcut to open the Run command.
  2. Type gpedit.msc and click OK to open the Local Group Policy Editor.
  3. Browse the following path:Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > System > Internet Communication Management > Internet Communication settings
  4. On the right side, double-click the Turn off Windows Customer Experience Improvement Program policy.

  1. On the top-left, select the Enabled option to disable the policy.

  1. Click Apply.
  2. Click OK.
  3. Close the Group Policy editor.
  4. Restart your computer to complete the task.

Once you completed the steps, all users in your computer will no longer be participating in the Customer Experience Improvement Program.

You can always revert the changes by using the same steps, but this time on step 5, make sure to select the Not configured option.

How to stop the Customer Experience Improvement Program using Registry

The Home version of Windows 10 doesn't include the Local Group Policy Editor, but you can use the Registry to opt-out of the Customer Experience Improvement Program on your computer.

To turn off the Customer Experience Improvement Program, do the following:

  1. Use the Windows key + R keyboard shortcut to open the Run command.
  2. Type regedit, and click OK to open the registry.
  3. Browse the following path:HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\SQMClient
  4. Select the SQMClient (folder) key, right-click it, select New, and click Key.

  1. Name the key Windows and press Enter.
  2. Select the newly created key, right-click on the right side, select New, and click on DWORD (32-bit) Value.

  1. Name the DWORD CEIPEnable and press Enter.
  2. Double-click the newly created DWORD and make sure its value is set to 0.
  3. Click OK.

  1. Close the Registry.
  2. Restart your computer to complete the task.

After completing the steps, your computer running Windows 10 Home or Pro should no longer send hardware configuration and software usage to Microsoft.

You can always revert the changes by using the same steps, but this time on step 8, make sure to change the DWORD CEIPEnable value from 0 to 1.

Do you think Microsoft should include an easier way to opt-out of the program? Tell us in the comments below.

More Windows 10 resources

For more help articles, coverage, and answers on Windows 10, you can visit the following resources:

Mauro Huculak is technical writer for WindowsCentral.com. His primary focus is to write comprehensive how-tos to help users get the most out of Windows 10 and its many related technologies. He has an IT background with professional certifications from Microsoft, Cisco, and CompTIA, and he's a recognized member of the Microsoft MVP community.

40 Comments
  • "Windows 10 devices secretly send hardware and software usage information to Microsoft"
    ​This statement is absolutely false. It is well documented that they do this. It is not, and never has been a secret.
  • Not only is it not a secret but its also practised by nearly everyone (except maybe linux).
  • That does not change the fact that its a privacy issue, and 90% of people have no idea this info is being sent to Microsoft, so in that sense it is a secret because the normal user does not know about it and Microsoft enables it by default.
  • 99% of Windows users dont know what powershell is, but that doesnt mean Microsoft "secretely installs powershell" into Windows.
  • Define privacy issue. I don't think you're really grasping what they are collecting.
  • thats a privacy problem. They are collecting "something"... they need to provide detailed informations about those informations and the processes involving in collecting informations. Its a seriouse problem investigated by the EU
  • Not only is it not a secret but its also practised by nearly everyone (except maybe linux).
    What a great justification: Everyone does it, so it must be fine.
    "Windows 10 devices secretly send hardware and software usage information to Microsoft"
    ​This statement is absolutely false. It is well documented that they do this. It is not, and never has been a secret.
    That fact that they are collecting data isn't a secret. But what data exactly they are collecting, is very much secret. And even if they gave information on what is being collected, since no one can verify that it still would be a very big privacy issue.
  • do YOU know exactly what they are collecting ? How do you know that is ALL they are taking ?
  • Just another idiot putting so much blind faith in their devine company, it happens on every side of the fence...
  • Thank you!
  • Privacy = joke
  • The Toggles are off in All Apple Operating systems. Off by default. You have to Opt-In. They do it the right way. So you're kind of wrong. If you buy an iPhone, iPad, Mac, etc. then by default they is all turned off and they get nothing unless you actually go into settings and decide to give it to them. Everything on Windows is on by default, and it's hard AF to find all of these settings to them them off (and that's assuming they don't disable the registry fix in an update you can't avoid). I'm getting exasperated with all of the management that comes with maintaining your privacy on a f*ck*ng desktop PC I own just because I run a Microsoft Operating System. This is worse than a damn Google account.
  • You're missing the point. Of course, Microsoft has documented this feature. I mean part of it, you can read it in the policy itself. The point of "secretely" was to imply that you don't see the details of every piece of information before it's sent to Microsoft. And second, most regular users don't even know that Microsoft collects such information, so like @John20212 said " in that sense it is a secret because the normal user does not know about it and Microsoft enables it by default." Thanks,
  • Secretly sending something and sending something secret is not the same thing. You should reword the sentence.
  • Yeah Mauro, the word "SECRETLY" needs to be removed or you need to clarify what you meant. That the details of what is being sent isn't clear.
  • Takes me back to when WinXP was released. Linux and Mac fans were having a fit over XP, because when you ran Windows update, it would send a list of the hardware in your computer so that they could determine if you needed a new driver, and a list of software installed so they could check for patches. And of course this was a horrible breach of privacy and trust. Huge conspiracy theories were invented that if you used Microsoft competing software, they would reach across the internet and do something to your computer to stop that software from running, and you would need to buy the Microsoft version to get work done. And somehow, with a list of hardware in use, then Microsoft would be able to somehow use that information to track you down to where you personally live and they would do bad things to you - BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING! Of course, now the big three have app stores, where a list of apps you purchased are kept and maintained. Apple and Google restrict what software you can install for many of their devices to that store, no circumvention, and you cannot change that. Companies like Google will force push an update to your ChromeBook or other ChomeOS device you run without any choice. Apple boasts of the millions of credit card numbers they have which includes far more personally identifiable information you could ever determine from the model of video card you have installed. But Microsoft can see what video card you have - EVERYBODY PANIC!!!!! THIS MUST NOT BE ALLOWED! EVERYONE SWITCH TO APPLE! I would expect more, WC. And didn't Daniel write an article months ago saying that this is not a big deal, but now the scare tactics?
  • It gets clicks and views.
  • They also used to complain about how unstable Windows was prior to such info collection...
  • This guy always writes stuff like this, he can't help it. But some of them are actually useful, nit like this one :D
  • haha, you enlighted everybody!!! Comparing XP with Windows 10... nice joke dude. Now tell us what EXACTLY does W10 collect every single hour on every single PC around the world. I mean DETAILED informations about those processes not just some random BS without explanation - proof
  • Damn, you are my hero for writing and detailing what I was thinking
  • User name fits... No "one" home The differnce of today over XP days is 85-90% of the users of WIndows 10 use broadband who have access to it. Back in XP days, it was like 40-50% (again for people who can access it) This allows them a larger pipe to send back data IF they CHOSE to and I am sure at one point Microsoft has sent back MORE data then they documented. There is nothing wrong with having control of what you send them
  • If you have hardware that can be exploited (like a router that shows up as a device in your OS), then that information can be used in a malicious manner. When you don't know how the data is used and who is given access to it, it is a legitimate concern. "YAAAAAS! She's running Nvidia driver version . We got an exploit for that."
  • #titlegore
  • I don't care about Windows 10 telemetry and I consider it very important for Microsoft can detect and fix the problems of the operating system.
  • let's be honest windows 10 can get a little creepy at times to give an example ( Not implying this is a bad thing) I was using my dvd player alot one day on my desktop then went over to my tablet in the start menu suggestions Windows dvd player. Example number 2 I'm not a gamer But I purchase my first Steam game I go to Windows store later that day and see an app called steam tile in pick for you list
  • Creepy yes, but convienent ;).
  • ha indeed.
  • Sounds creepy, but not really. what you just have working for you are sync / Continue where you left off plus usage predictive algorithm, guess who uses the predictive usage algorithm the most? Google and Amazon.
    Try it, search for a particular item and or product on Amazon, from the next day, you will see all kinds of alternative of that item and or product ads every web page you go.
  • #asoyemi l did not say it was a bad thing but if you were a long time, Windows 7 slash XP user like I was it I can See how it can be a little Jarring or creepy to some user
  • Create registry key: New-ItemProperty -Path HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\SQMClient -Name CEIPEnable -Value 0 -PropertyType DWORD -Force | out-null  Update registry key: Set-ItemProperty  -Path HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\SQMClient -Name CEIPEnable -Value 1 Should work as well on home version using PowerShell.
  • Correction:   Create registry key: New-ItemProperty -Path HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\SQMClient -Name CEIPEnable -Value 0 -PropertyType DWORD -Force | out-null  Update registry key: Set-ItemProperty  -Path HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\SQMClient -Name CEIPEnable -Value 1 Should work as well on home version using PowerShell.
  • I don't see the 'SQMClient' key in the Registry Editor. I'm using Home edition.
  • I want them to collect more and better. Can you please make an article about how? And this is not a joke. I want Microsoft to know everything about myself and my devices to receive specific content for me. Places to go, things to purchase, music to listen. I want technology to be INTELIGENT and know me better than myself. THAT IS THE FUTURE.
  • Wow, there are several things worth opting out of under the same key. Review all the options here!
  • Using internet and thinking about privacy at the same time is called foolishness.
  • Very true. I turned this off not because of "privacy" but to save bandwidth and data usuage however small it might be. I'm on a data limited plan with mediocre bandwidth.
  • LOL True that...
  • MS needs telemetry data to find bugs in Windows 10 and fix them. If you complain about this data gathering, you have no right to complain about bugs not getting fixed in a timely manner.
     
  • AH, all registry settings, I'll make a quick reg file when I get home, so I can just import it into every Windows 10 computer I run into :) I'll put it on my 256gb flash drive that I carry everwhere I go...