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Microsoft and Apple working to fix iCloud issues with October 2018 Update

iCloud on Windows 10
iCloud on Windows 10 (Image credit: Windows Central)

The Windows 10 October 2018 Update finally started making its way back out to the public last week, but it's still experiencing its fair share of issues. One of the latest to crop up is a bug that can cause headaches for iCloud users, preventing Apple's cloud service from updating and syncing shared albums (opens in new tab) (via Engadget).

The issue is seen with iCloud for Windows version 7.7.0.27, which will also fail to install on PCs running the October 2018 Update. For now, Microsoft has put an upgrade block in place so PCs that are already running iCloud for Windows won't be able to install the October 2018 Update.

To ensure a seamless experience, Microsoft is blocking devices with iCloud for Windows (version 7.7.0.27) software installed from being offered Window 10, version 1809 until this issue has been resolved.

Microsoft says it is working with Apple on a version of iCloud that works with the latest Windows 10 release. However, there's no timeline on when to expect the updated iCloud to drop.

The iCloud bug is just one of five known issues with the October 2018 Update, four of which have caused Microsoft to put upgrade blocks in place. This also comes after the update's troubled release, which saw Microsoft pull it in early October after it was discovered that some users' files were going missing after installation.

Dan Thorp-Lancaster is the Editor in Chief for Windows Central. He began working with Windows Central as a news writer in 2014 and is obsessed with tech of all sorts. You can follow Dan on Twitter @DthorpL and Instagram @heyitsdtl. Got a hot tip? Send it to daniel.thorp-lancaster@futurenet.com.

12 Comments
  • The problem isn't with Insiders failing to catch these issues. The problem is with MSFT depending too much on them to do it.
  • Exactly. I am an Insider but have not and will not install any Apple software on my PC.
  • You are maybe confused. The fact that there is an upgrade block means that they *did* catch it. That's the whole point of their process. The recent breathless reporting of these upgrade block issues is intended to feed into the narrative that the 1809 is "buggy mess", but in fact, this is normal and happens for every Windwos 10 feature update. There is never a case where 100% of third-party software and drivers are compatible with new Windows updates, and so Microsoft withholds the update from affected devices until said software is updated. Blocked updates are not evidence of a problem, but of a properly working process. We're just hearing about these more today because it supports the narrative of the moment.
  • It is a bit trite to say there are always bugs, but as the articles says, "The iCloud bug is just one of five known issues with the October 2018 Update, four of which have caused Microsoft to put upgrade blocks in place." Upgrade blocks cannot be fixed with CUs (because the block prevents installation of the build to be fixed in the first place), so how is it you deduce a "working process"? I'm sure MSFT is examining their proactive testing thoroughly right now and will make it more robust, but there are already signs that new releases are "a mess." And maybe they really are.
  • No, that's an inaccurate characterization. Upgrade blocks happen with every release because incompatibilities in an ecosystem as complex as Windows' are inevitable. This practice prevents users from experiencing the bugs until the compatibilities are fixed. That is exactly how it's supposed to work. Should Microsoft hold up the entire release indefinitely until Apple updates it's software? Of course not. What evidence do you have the the issue is entirely Microsoft's? It is certain that the fix requires changes in Apple's code, hence the reason they are working together. Just waving your hands and calling Windows "buggy" is a gross oversimplification.
  • No, apple needs to be testing the compatibility of its own software with 1809, NOT Microsoft.
  • The Same on iOS and Android side. All apps and games need to be tested, every time a new iOS / Android update happened. How many test need to be done you ask?
    Different OS version x iPhone, iPad every-gen.
    Android side? 2 years old ~ newest phones from every popular makers.
  • Apple should have been testing their software with the 1809 version of Win10, this is completely on apple.
  • I hope you are not saying all of these blocks are "completely on Apple." How about addressing the rest of the "messes" that don't involve third-party providers? Does not MSFT need to address the impact of these problems on increasingly negative public perceptions that are being reported here and elsewhere in the tech media? Does not MSFT need to work a lot more on heading off these problems? There are always naysayers, but I don't think this is all just naysaying.
  • Same on iOS and Android side. All apps and games need to be tested, every time a new iOS / Android update happened. How many test need to be done you ask?
    Different OS version x iPhone, iPad every-gen.
    Android side? 2 years old ~ newest phones from every popular makers.
  • As long as 1809 is billed as backward compatible with 1803, this is Microsoft's problem. This is the headache for every operating system, library or service provider in existence and Microsoft is not an exception.
  • Thanks Heaven! My iCloud version is 7.6.0...