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Stories: the Path of Destinies will redefine 'Choose Your Own Adventure' gaming

Stories: The Path of Destinies, from Spearhead Games, overflows with choices that actually affect the outcome of the story. This stands in stark contrast to Telltale, makers of the upcoming M-rated Batman adventure game, who have often been criticized for failing to provide players with enough meaningful choices in their games. You get to make lots of choices in The Wolf Among Us, Game of Thrones, etc. but most of them lead to the same outcome. Thus these games feature the illusion of choice far more than the real thing.

Stories: The Path of Destinies is action-adventure game that takes place in a colorful fairytale world filled with talking animals, airships, and mysterious technology. A unique choose-your-own adventure mechanic allows players to steer the story in hundreds of different directions. Stories is coming to Steam and PlayStation 4 in April. Read on for full impressions and our interview video with gameplay!

Fight the power

Stories: the Path of Destinies

Stories: The Path of Destinies follows the adventures of Reynardo, a roguish adventurer who captains an airship called the Farfarer. Reynardo is the last hope of the Rebellion – not the makers of the upcoming Sniper Elite 4 but an actual rebellion poised against an evil dictator. The Empire has been kidnapping innocent villagers in order to sacrifice them to the old gods.

Although The Rebellion faces near-certain destruction, Reynardo possesses a secret weapon that could turn the tide of battle: a magic book. This book allows him to make choices, experience their outcome, then go back and do things differently. Things will usually go poorly for our hero and his friends, but if he can just make the right choices, eventually they will overcome the evil Empire.

Stories: the Path of Destinies

Each time you play, you'll experience your own story lasting approximately an hour. Reynardo will continually face do-or-die choices, each leading to entirely different outcomes and adventures. For instance, he might have to choose between saving a friend's life or seeking a relic that will aid the Rebellion. Each of these choices leads to not only unique areas, but more choices that branch the story even further. Few games give players so much control over the outcome of their stories.

A dashing hero

Stories: the Path of Destinies

Stories plays like a fast-paced Zelda game. Reynardo explores a variety of distinct floating worlds, breaking barrels, solving simple puzzles, and doing battle with the Empire's forces. Exploring these areas is a pleasure thanks to the hero's dash move. He can zoom all over the place, traversing distances quickly and escaping from danger in a flash.

When Reynardo runs afoul of enemies, he'll engage in sword-based combat. Again, the fights resemble an amped-up Zelda. Not only can Reynardo dash about like a madman, but he also wields a powerful Hookshot. This hook-and-chain grabs enemies and pulls them closer, not unlike Scorpion's signature move in Mortal Kombat. Counters and the ability to grab and throw enemies add further depth to the fighting.

Stories: the Path of Destinies

Although each Stories adventure lasts a relatively short time, the game still features upgrade mechanics that enhance replay value. Reynardo collects crafting materials from chests and crates that he can spend to forge and upgrade an arsenal of elemental swords. These swords unlock gates of the same element, opening up new pathways in subsequent playthroughs. Reynardo levels up by earning XP, allowing him to unlock new skills from an upgrade tree.

Stories: the Path of Destinies

With clever choose-your-own-adventure elements, fast and fluid combat, and lots of fun areas to explore, Stories: The Path of Destinies looks like an action-adventure game of choice. Hopefully, the full game proves as engaging as the press demo when it launches on Steam and PlayStation 4 on April 12th.

What are some games you've played that offer meaningful choices, adventurers? Leave a comment and let us know!

Paul Acevedo is the Games Editor at Windows Central. A lifelong gamer, he has written about videogames for over 15 years and reviewed over 350 games for our site. Follow him on Twitter @PaulRAcevedo. Don’t hate. Appreciate!

21 Comments
  • Only on Steam and PS4? I couldn't care less.
  • I was thinking the same thing. The definition of "windows" or "microsoft" news is sometimes head scratching around here (admittedly I just read the headline)
  • Steam runs on this platform called Windows. We don't do a ton of Steam coverage, but it falls under our purview and we do give interesting Steam titles a chance when we have the time.
  • Not to troll.. but Steam also runs on linux (ever hear of a Steambox).. Anyway.. not really complaining (despite what you might think).. it just hit me as a little weird.. that's all...
  • True, Steam games sometimes run on other platforms as well. But you can be assured that if we write about one, it runs on Windows PCs/tablets.
  • Steam gaming is gaming on windows. I for one enjoy My gaming news. As I always say... If an article does not intrest me. I do not read it. So why comment if you dont like it??? Posted via the Windows Central App for Android
  • Oh come on.. paul doesnt need this bull on his articles. ;) Posted via the Windows Central App for Android
  • Because we had to read halfway through the article before we found out that this was a PS4 and Steam title, rather than a Mobile or Xbox title, and only then were we not interested in it. When reviewing games (or other software), the platform should be in the title, or at least the first sentance or two to help draw people who are interested and warn away those who are not.
  • It's in the article summary (which appears on the main page before clicking on the story) and the second paragraph of the actual story. I would've liked to have included platform in the headline, but we couldn't due to length. Also, this is not a review, just a preview/interview piece.
  • Good question. I dont thing many games I play have meaningful questions. Or I dont realise it at the time since I dont play the game again and again. Looks fun my be a steam pickup ill add it to my watchlist. Posted via the Windows Central App for Android
  • Good point. The Mass Effect series had a few.
  • Well that's a damn shame no UWP app... I would love to support these developer with awsome game concepts, but even though I have a PS4, I have it only for exclusive (other than BloodBorne, have sucked monkey, hopefully uncharted will be awsome)... here is to hoping for a UWA comming after build!
  • It is technically a PS4 exclusive (most exclusives on both consoles get PC ports), so you should feel free to grab it if you don't want the Steam version.
  • I was not aware of the PS4 exclusivity... I'm not a fan of steam gamming, therefore, you are correct and prolly end up picking up the PS4 version (though i'm not happy about it, lol).  I did forget to mention great preview article by the way Paul.
  • Thanks man!
  • Game looks nice, too bad it's not on Xbox One :(
  • Life is Strange, Heavy Rain and Beyond: Two Souls have a fair amount of choices to alter their games. I only played each once and am unsure how much the games and plots change with each choice, but had the feeling choices in Life is Strange made the largest impact. I enjoyed re-reading Choose your own adventure books growing up, but replaying games, not enough time or care.
  • Never heard of this one and it looks fun. Thanks for sharing.
  • I can't recall a game that has real choice that I played. Then again, I seem to recall such a game that was streamed last night. I'll get that in a couple of weeks! This is an interesting thing, though, and I've honestly expected more games to take this kind of approach, like with Quantum Break. It would seem that RPGs could really gives folks great, unique experiences with this approach.
  • This looks like fun, I'll keep my eye open for a decent sale on it.
  • I'll grab this on my PS4, it's part of the Launch Party promo over there.