Windows 8 Pro Student Upgrade Lead

Tomorrow may be the last day to snag the early bird upgrade price on Windows 8 Pro, but students have a bit of wiggle room going forward.

For whatever reason if you were planning on upgrading your PC to Windows 8 Pro, you should do it now and lock in that sweet $40 upgrade fee, because it goes up to $200 for Pro. However, students can wing it for $69.99 starting February 1st in the US with staggered roll outs depending on your location.

Being a student has its fair share of ups and downs. Some of the big ups include getting an education, booze, undergrads, and more undergrads. While the downs are mostly limited to no money, no money, and even less money. One perk is the ability to get software on the cheap and Windows 8 Pro will be no exception.

We already mentioned that qualified students can get the Windows 8 Pro upgrade edition at a reasonable $69.99 (hold your laughs) here in the United States starting February 1st. Here is how the rest of the roll out looks for dates and locations.

February 1st - United States

February 21st - Canada, UK, Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Portugal, Hong Kong, Australia, New Zealand, Brazil, Russia, and Luxembourg.

March 7th - Bulgaria, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Korea, Latvia, and Lithuania.

March 19th - Israel, Kuwait, Oman, South Africa, UAE, Malaysia, Malta, Mexico, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Singapore, Slovakia, Taiwan, and Vietnam.

In addition to offering students Windows 8 Pro at a discount, Microsoft will kick off a ‘Windows Campus Tour’ on February 18th that travels to over 150 university campuses in the U.S.

Of course there is a fine print, this offer is only for eligible students, faculty and staff. It requires verification of that eligibility prior to purchase. Hit up the source link below if this offer is something you’re interested in. But really, take advantage of the $40 offer today before its too late. 

Source: Windows Blog