The ThinkPad 25 is a limited-edition throwback to the original IBM ThinkPad. While it's not cheap, this is one laptop built for work that road warriors will appreciate.

We recently reviewed the ThinkPad 25 – a throwback celebratory creation from Lenovo to honor the legendary laptop line.

While the laptop is mostly a re-branded Lenovo T470 (see review), there are a few nods to the original ThinkPad including recreating its popular seven-row keyboard and adding a few retro design elements.

Sure, the near $1,900 price tag is a bit high, but this laptop is MIL-SPEC built laptop is a workhorse with excellent battery life, a great typing experience, and all the ports you can use (including a built-in RJ-45). The NVIDIA GeForce 940 MX also gives a little extra push to the 7th gen Intel Core i7 processor and the 16GB of RAM and 512GB PCIe SSD are solid performers too.

Category XX
Processor Dual-core
Intel Core i7-7500U (up to 3.5GHz)
Storage 512GB PCIe SSD
RAM 16GB DDR4-2133MHz
Display 14-inch FHD (1,920 x 1,080)
IPS, matte, touch
Graphics Intel HD Graphics 620
NVIDIA GeForce 940MX with 2GB GDDR5 VRAM
Ports Three USB-A 3.0
USB-C Thunderbolt 3
HDMI 1.4
RJ45 Ethernet
3.5mm jack
4-in-1 card reader
Mechanical ThinkPad dock port
Speakers Dual stereo speakers
Dolby Audio Premium
Wireless Intel dual-band wireless AC 8265
802.11ac (2 x 2)
Bluetooth 4.1
Camera Front-facing 720p
IR camera
Touchpad Precision
Biometrics Fingerprint reader
IR camera
Battery Three-cell 24WHr (inner)
Three-cell 24WHr (hot-swappable)
Weight 3.48 pounds (1.6kg)
Dimensions 13.25 inches x 9.15 inches x 0.79 inches
336.6mm x 232.5mm x 19.95mm
Color ThinkPad black
Price Starting at about $1,900

Luckily, this laptop is only for the diehards who need a field computer. While a Surface Laptop is more beautiful looking the ThinkPad25 is built for the road.

Make sure you read our full review for benchmarks and more details, but for now you can watch my unboxing and quick-thoughts on this limited-edition creation.

See at Lenovo

Related reading

A former cubicle jockey's awkward ode to the ThinkPad