Best CPU for AMD Radeon RX 6800 XT in 2020

Amd Radeon Rx 6800 Xt
Amd Radeon Rx 6800 Xt (Image credit: ASRock)

Picking an Intel or AMD processor for a PC build with an AMD Radeon RX 6800 XT will provide some awesome gaming results, but if you want the absolute best at launch, you'll want to go with an AMD Ryzen 5000 series CPU. The Radeon RX 6800 XT isn't AMD's best graphics card, but it does have some considerable firepower for even the most demanding PC games. We've rounded up some of the best CPUs to use with it.

Choosing the best CPU for AMD Radeon RX 6800 XT

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Picking up the right CPU for your gaming PC build largely comes down to what you plan on playing. If it's simply Fortnite, you can get away with an AMD Ryzen 5 or Intel Core i5 and RX 6800 XT to call it a day. Should you want to try some more demanding games at higher resolutions, it may be worth investing in a better processor. If you want the very best, go with the AMD Ryzen 9 5950X (opens in new tab).

As aforementioned, you likely won't require all that performance, which is where the excellent AMD Ryzen 9 5900X (opens in new tab) comes into play. It's a little cheaper, has fewer cores, but is more reasonable for gaming (and your budget). For an Intel motherboard and PC build, you'll want to go with the exceptionally powerful Intel Core i9-10850K (opens in new tab).

If you're all about value, the AMD Ryzen 7 5800X (opens in new tab) is a great middle-ground that balances performance and price. The same goes for the Intel Core i7-10700K (opens in new tab), which is almost as good as the i9-10900K sibling. There are other value options, too, if you feel comfortable going for a processor with fewer cores and threads.

Rich Edmonds
Senior Editor, PC Build

Rich Edmonds is Senior Editor of PC hardware at Windows Central, covering everything related to PC components and NAS. He's been involved in technology for more than a decade and knows a thing or two about the magic inside a PC chassis. You can follow him over on Twitter at @RichEdmonds.