How to get full PC memory specs (speed, size, type, part number, form factor) on Windows 10

Windows 10 Check Ram Specs
Windows 10 Check Ram Specs (Image credit: Windows Central)

On Windows 10, the ability to check the memory's tech specs — RAM (Random Access Memory) — installed on your computer can come in handy in many situations. For example, when you have to troubleshoot hardware and software-related problems, and details like the manufacturer name, part number, and serial number can be useful when contacting technical support.

If your device is degrading performance as a result of memory-demanding applications or games, upgrading the memory can improve performance. Also, knowing the RAM specs can help determine the right size, speed, and brand to purchase a compatible upgrade kit.

Or when adjusting the memory settings in the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI) or Basic Input/Output System (BIOS), the RAM information in advance will also help you know if the configuration has been applied correctly.

Whatever the reason might be, Windows 10 provides all the necessary information using Command Prompt without the need to open the device or install third-party tools.

Related: How to quickly determine memory slots available on motherboard on Windows 10

In this Windows 10 guide, we will walk you through the steps to learn the technical specifications of the RAM installed on your computer, including part number, manufacturer, serial number, speed, capacity, form factor, memory type, etc.

How to check RAM specification using Command Prompt

While you can use Task Manager to view the memory specs information, if you want to determine more specific details, such as manufacturer, part number, serial number, and more, then you have several commands.

Check memory manufacturer

To determine the memory modules brand installed on the computer, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Type Command Prompt, right-click the top result, and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to check the memory manufacturer name and press Enter:wmic memorychip get devicelocator, manufacturer

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Confirm the memory brand under the "Manufacturer" column.

Check memory part number

To find out the part number of each memory module on Windows 10, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Type Command Prompt, right-click the top result, and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to determine the part number of the memory module and press Enter:wmic memorychip get devicelocator, partnumber

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Confirm the product number under the "PartNumber" column.

If your desktop computer feels sluggish, a RAM upgrade is perhaps one of the best ways to improve system performance. If you're not sure which memory modules to purchase, our pick for most devices is the Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 16GB Kit. It has reliable performance and quality components, and it's affordable.

Check memory serial number

To find out the RAM serial number on your computer, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Type Command Prompt, right-click the top result, and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to view the serial number for each memory stick and press Enter:wmic memorychip get devicelocator, serialnumberQuick tip: In the command, you can also replace "devicelocator" with "banklabel" to list the serial number showing the bank's physical label where the memory is located on the motherboard. For example, wmic memorychip get banklabel, serialnumber

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Confirm the product identifier under the "SerialNumber" column.

Check memory capacity

Using Command Prompt, you can determine the total capacity per module and the entire system.

Determine capacity per memory module

To check each memory module capacity on Windows 10, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Type Command Prompt, right-click the top result, and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to determine the memory capacity and press Enter:wmic memorychip get devicelocator, capacity

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Confirm the size of each memory module under the "Capacity" column.Quick tip: The capacity information is displayed in bytes, but you can divide the number by 1,073,741,824 (1 gigabyte in bytes) to convert the data into gigabytes.

Determine total system memory capacity

To find out the total amount of memory installed on the computer, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Type Command Prompt, right-click the top result, and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to determine the total physical memory and press Enter:systeminfo | findstr /C:"Total Physical Memory"

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Confirm the total amount of physical memory (in megabytes) installed on the device.

Check memory module speed

To confirm the operating module speed, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Type Command Prompt, right-click the top result, and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to determine the memory speed and press Enter:wmic memorychip get devicelocator, speed

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Confirm the speed of the memory modules (in MHz) under the "Speed" column

Check memory type

To check the system memory type on Windows 10, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Type Command Prompt, right-click the top result, and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to determine the memory type and press Enter:wmic memorychip get devicelocator, memorytype

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Under the "MemoryType" column, confirm the number that identifies the type of memory. (See list below.)

Supported types

Memory types the command can identify:

  • 0: Unknown.
  • 1: Other.
  • 2: DRAM.
  • 3: Synchronous DRAM.
  • 4: Cache DRAM.
  • 5: EDO.
  • 6: EDRAM.
  • 7: VRAM.
  • 8: SRAM.
  • 9: RAM.
  • 10: ROM.
  • 11: Flash.
  • 12: EEPROM.
  • 13: FEPROM.
  • 14: EPROM.
  • 15: CDRAM.
  • 16: 3DRAM.
  • 17: SDRAM.
  • 18: SGRAM.
  • 19: RDRAM.
  • 20: DDR.
  • 21: DDR2.
  • 22: DDR2 FB-DIMM.
  • 24: DDR3.
  • 25: FBD2.
  • 26: DDR4.

Check memory form factor

To check whether the modules are DIMM or SODIMM, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Type Command Prompt, right-click the top result, and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to check the memory form factor and press Enter:wmic memorychip get devicelocator, formfactor

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Under the FormFactor column, confirm the form factor information.Quick note: If the output is 8, the device uses DIMM modules (typically available on desktops). Otherwise, if the command output the number 12, the computer uses SODIMM modules (usually available on laptops).

Supported form factors

Form factors the command can identify:

  • 0: Unknown.
  • 1: Other.
  • 2: SIP.
  • 3: DIP.
  • 4: ZIP.
  • 5: SOJ
  • 6: Proprietary.
  • 7: SIMM.
  • 8: DIMM.
  • 9: TSOP.
  • 10: PGA.
  • 11: RIMM.
  • 12: SODIMM.
  • 13: SRIMM.
  • 14: SMD.
  • 15: SSMP.
  • 16: QFP.
  • 17: TQFP.
  • 18: SOIC.
  • 19: LCC.
  • 20: PLCC.
  • 21: BGA.
  • 22: FPBGA.
  • 23: LGA.
  • 24: FB-DIMM.

Check all memory details

The above commands help you to determine the most useful information about the RAM installed on your computer. However, there is another command you can use to query all the available details at the same time.

To view all the memory details on Windows 10, then use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Type Command Prompt, right-click the top result, and select the Run as administrator option.
  3. Type the following command to list every memory detail possible and press Enter:wmic memorychip list full

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Confirm the available information for each memory module installed on the device.
  2. (Optional) Type the following command to view only the specific details and press Enter:wmic memorychip get devicelocator, manufacturer, partnumber, serialnumber, capacity, speed, memorytype, formfactor

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Confirm the memory information.

Once you complete the steps, you will have many details about the memory modules installed on your Windows 10 device.

While you can use Command Prompt to query many details about the RAM specifications on your computer, some information may not be available depending on the system's hardware.

More Windows resources

For more helpful articles, coverage, and answers to common questions about Windows 10 and Windows 11, visit the following resources:

Mauro Huculak is technical writer for WindowsCentral.com. His primary focus is to write comprehensive how-tos to help users get the most out of Windows 10 and its many related technologies. He has an IT background with professional certifications from Microsoft, Cisco, and CompTIA, and he's a recognized member of the Microsoft MVP community.

9 Comments
  • I'm looking forward to the day when SSD become fast enough to double as both RAM & ROM. Less hardware to contend with and they could steal from each other.
  • I hope but doubt that.
    Don't forget that RAM is also progressing as well as SSD so I don't think that SSD speed will ever catch to the speed of RAM.
  • True, but the evolution of RAM should also move to be non-volatile, so even if flash doesn't catch up, RAM itself can take on the role of SSD, at least for the OS and Programs.
  • Flash memory longevity is still an issue. RAM can undergo almost infinite read-write cycles without damage to the physical structure. NAND flash can't, each write cycle changes the memory cell until the threshold voltage for a full erase gets too high.
  • I can't tell you how many times someone asks me to look at their PC because "it's acting weird" and I find that their memory is either:
    A) The wrong speed (too slow. too fast (yes, it CAN be too fast.)
    B) Mismatched memory modules (no, you CAN'T just slap in anything you want.)
    C) Not supported by their motherboard/CPU/BIOS/UEFI combo.
    D) Wrong power rating (Voltage/Type)
    I won't even try to explain the CAS/RAS/Timing and Voltage requirements here, there are plenty of those explanations on the Google to watch.
    Suffice it to say, check the manufacturers specifications for you Motherboard/CPU/BIOS/UEFI and follow them.
    DON'T buy the "cheapest" memory just on price. It's cheap for a reason.
    Also, make sure you power supply and cooling can handle the extra memory you are adding/replacing.
  • Or you could just use Speccy, the free hardware interrogator program from the same folks who created CCleaner.
  • I use speccy for CPU temp on taskbar
    I used Speedfan for that, but that doesn't work anymore as I liked that
    No average temp only a clusterfuck of temp readings. I have a 6c 12p i7 8750h. really love it
  • It's interesting that you don't use PowerShell, it's less cryptic.
    PS>Get-WmiObject Win32_PhysicalMemory
    Shows values for all properties in a readable list.
    If you want to see only particular properties and their values, pipe the results through Select-Object.
    With PowerShell's short syntax, it could be as easy as:
    PS> gwmi Win32_PhysicalMemory|select manufacturer,partnumber,speed,banklabel,caption
  • With x86 architecture can it use Unified Memory?