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How to change RAID type on Synology NAS

Synology DS419slim
Synology DS419slim (Image credit: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central)

Synology DSM 7.0

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)

If you're planning to add more drives to your Synology NAS or simply wish to change the RAID configuration, it's an easy process that takes but a few moments in DiskStation Manager. While there are a few restrictions on changing RAID levels, it's possible to move from RAID 1 to RAID 6, SHR-1 to SHR-2, and more.

How to change RAID on Synology NAS

Before we begin changing the RAID level, it's worth noting a few important considerations and restrictions. It's easier to increase the level of RAID (for instance, move from RAID 1 to RAID 2). It's vital the storage pool status is "Healthy" and (if adding drives) that they are larger or equal to the smallest drive in the pool.

You can change the RAID type on a Synology NAS, but this is limited to just a few levels.

Current RAIDNew RAIDNew HDDs required
BasicRAID 11
BasicRAID 52
RAID 1RAID 51
RAID 5RAID 61
SHR-1SHR-21-2 (depends on SHR drive config)

Making the switch is pretty straightforward on DSM 7.0. I'd recommend using Synology Hybrid RAID (SHR) if you're not familiar with choosing the best RAID on Synology NAS.

  1. Back up all of your data!
  2. Launch Storage Manager.
  3. Go to Storage Pool.

Synology DSM 7.0

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Choose the storage pool to change the RAID type on and select the drop-down menu.
  2. Click Change RAID Type.

Synology DSM 7.0

Source: Windows Central (Image credit: Source: Windows Central)
  1. Choose the new RAID type.
  2. Click Next.
  3. Select the drives to add to the existing storage pool.
  4. Click Next.
  5. Complete the wizard.

Your storage pool will then switch to the new RAID type and initialize the best and most reliable hard drives for a Synology NAS.

Rich Edmonds is a word conjurer at Windows Central, covering everything related to Windows, gaming, and hardware. He's been involved in technology for more than a decade and knows a thing or two about the magic inside a device chassis. You can follow him over on Twitter at @RichEdmonds.