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Windows 10 Review

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Surface-Pro-3-windows-10 (Image credit: Dan Rubino / Windows Central)

Windows 8.1 and everything before it is dead. Long live Windows 10.

This chant is what Microsoft is indirectly telling the public with its first major OS overhaul since 2012's Windows 8. Moreover, let's be clear for die-hard Windows fans the last few years have been nothing but a battle. The general public has all but ignored Microsoft's tiled new world and slumping PC sales reflect this indifference too. Toss in the rise of mobile computing and Microsoft had to do something radical to win back its audience.

Windows 10 is supposed to be that clarion call for change. Windows 10 is not just a new OS but an entire platform that very shortly will span PCs, laptops, tablets, wearable accessories, holographic computers and even the Xbox One.

Windows 10 is an OS for all things and all people. So says Microsoft. It is never actually finished either. Microsoft is making Windows a 'service' with constant upgrades, new features, and patches resulting in a more dynamic computing environment. Does it hold up? What does someone like me who liked Windows 8.1 a lot think about all the changes?

This is my review of Windows 10.

Before we break down Windows 10 into its features along with the traditional 'the good, the bad and the ugly' let us talk about Microsoft's shift in philosophy. It is important for the bigger picture, so join me for the ride.

Windows Converged

Windows 10 is first and foremost not just an OS update. Sure it is that but it marks something much more dramatic namely the realization of the 'three screens and a cloud' vision from a few years back. Microsoft no longer uses this apt phrase, but it applies perfectly to Windows 10.

Back in 2009 Steve Ballmer described Microsoft's vision for the future in an interview for TechCrunch:

"We used to talk about mainframe computer, minicomputer, PC computing, client-server computing, graphical computing, the internet; I think this notion of three screens and a cloud, multiple devices that are all important, the cloud not just as a point of delivery of individual applications, but really as a new platform, a scale-out, very manageable platform that has services that span security contacts, I think it's a big deal...."

Ballmer goes on:

"It is the next big generational shift in the computing platform. And people are going to want applications, I'll call them that, or services, depending on whether you like old fashioned words or new words, but they're going to want things that service them across those environments ...."

Ballmer was referring to the convergence of computing around three screens -- the PC, the smartphone, and the television. This dream was not achieved in Windows 7, nor Windows 8. However, those were necessary steps to Windows 10 (Microsoft has skipped 'Windows 9' to convey this paradigm shift). Okay, there were missteps too. The core of Windows 10 is now applicable to servers, your home computer, and coming this year your smartphone, TV, and even the Microsoft Band wearable.

Assuming the world goes along with Microsoft, this change is a massive paradigm shift. Never have we seen an operating system that can live everywhere and be anything. Microsoft is attempting to transcend the home PC with a forward-looking OS that can be put on any computer no matter its size. Even the 'three screens' part is now outdated. Devices like HoloLens (holographic computer) and the Internet of Things (IoT) are devices that do not even have formal displays with a traditional graphical user interface (GUI). Windows 10 can run there too.

The beauty of this architecture is that if the traditional home PC as we know it dies (and it very well might) Microsoft's Windows will survive. Whether it is your tablet, athletic device, phone, gaming console or whatever comes next.

This introduction brings us to two major meta-level changes to Windows 10: Windows as a Service and Continuum.

Windows Forever

Windows 10 might as well be just called Windows. Version numbers are a conceptual device for demarcating upgrades. It no longer applies. Sure, we still need the '10' designation for other reasons. Try doing a web search for 'Windows' and you'll drown in a sea of vagary - but Windows 10 is the beginning of Windows as a Service (WaaS).

The phrase Windows as a Service is a bit misleading. For many, the word service implies punctuated monthly or yearly financial charges akin to Netflix or even Microsoft's own Office 365. However, this is not the case here. Assuming you have a PC or laptop with a valid Windows 7 or Windows 8 license key, Windows 10 is a free upgrade that will receive free upgrades for the life of the product.

Indeed, Microsoft offers complete support for Windows 10 until October 2020, including new feature additions. Further support for security and bug fixes run even longer through October 2025.

Once you upgrade to Windows 10, it is yours forever. Granted, Microsoft is likely to release a 'Windows 11' in 2020 but in four years, the computing world is also likely to be a very different place. Even then, it is not clear what Microsoft would do as there are extreme market pressures to keep Windows free persistently.

Good-bye Patch Tuesday

Putting aside the costs – or lack thereof – Microsoft's approach to Windows 10 is vastly different from previous desktop releases. The Windows team is not releasing massive service packs any longer with rolled-up fixes and new features. There likely won't be a 'Patch Tuesday' either for those once-a-month security updates.

Windows 10 users should instead expect a steady stream of updates whenever they are needed. One reason Microsoft can do this is they have broken down core OS components into separate, updatable apps through the Store.

No longer will users have to risk upgrading the OS each time Microsoft wants to change something. Instead, they are taking the smartphone model in which they can continually improve the OS through direct core component updates to users.

Microsoft's continuing iterations of Windows 10 means that it is a living, dynamic OS that could look and behave very differently in the years to come. This change is needed. The computing world is now very unstable, and Microsoft's OS needs to be proactive not just reactive.

Windows Anytime

In 2015, the home PC where families gather around to view the world through their screen is going away. Personal computing for the car ride, on the couch, at school, in the cubicle at work, is now the norm.

Continuum means that your computer changes according to your needs. Take away your keyboard and Windows 10 automatically goes all-touch.

Windows 10 can be used for your main computer. In fact, it is built for it. Nevertheless, the way we use devices has changed and Windows 10 reflects this with its new feature called Continuum. Continuum means that your computer changes according to your needs. One-half of this refers to the rise of 'two in one' computers which are a laptop one minute and a tablet another. That hardware story has been around for a few years now as exemplified by the Microsoft Surface. However, with Windows 10, the answer to how software can counter this hardware is here.

Continuum means when you remove your keyboard the OS adjusts to a touch-only interface, hiding elements for mouse and keyboard users. Alternatively, adding a keyboard and mouse shifts the OS back to a more traditional desktop environment. Windows 8 style for tablets, Windows 7 for PCs and laptops and no thought for the consumer.

Continuum is Microsoft's answer to those who complained about Windows 8 and 8.1 and its focus on touchscreens. In effect, Microsoft went too far with Windows 8, and now they are dialling it back with Windows 10. However, instead of just undoing what they did they are adding flexibility to the OS for different scenarios.

I'll talk more about Continuum and how well it works later on the in the review. For now, just know that with WaaS and Continuum, Microsoft is making Windows an OS for any device in a world that is always changing.

Start Menu Reborn

Ever since the release of Windows 95 computer users around the world have used the famed Start menu. Microsoft buried this beloved tool with Windows 8 forcing users instead to adopt its new touch-friendly Start Screen that took the full display.

Users revolted. People forgot about Windows.

Microsoft began to back away from this decision with Windows 8.1, which defaulted back to the desktop and old Start Menu for traditional PCs and laptops and kept the Start Screen for tablets. Although this bought Microsoft some time before Windows 10, this two-pronged approach was one of many redundancies in the OS that left a bad impression for users.

Windows 10 gets rid of the Start Screen. It still exists in a muted form for tablet users, but most people are greeted with the new Start Menu for Windows 10, which is an amalgamation of the old and the new. Instead of just a program menu, users can have a selection of apps that live as Live Tiles in the menu as well.

When companies try to do hybrid approaches they usually fail. This failure is because the feature feels like it is bolted on or forced. However, the new Start Menu in Windows 10 works because Microsoft gives users a choice. Yes, the new Start Menu is a chimera, but it is a good one that could have existed even if Windows 8 did not. In fact, here are the many ways users can configure and use the new Start Menu

  1. Start Menu + Tiles (default): Most used apps, Program file list, shortcuts and Live Tile area
  2. Start Menu: Most used apps, Program file list, shortcuts but no Live Tile area
  3. Start Menu + Tiles (full screen): Most used apps, Program file list, shortcuts and Live Tile area

Users can also simply grab the edge of the new Start menu to resize it vertically or horizontally until it takes as much space as they want. For those with large displays and a lot of Live Tiles, you may prefer to make this area of the menu large, whereas laptop users may opt for a smaller design.

All of these design choices are meant for different groups, including traditionalists (no Live Tiles) and those who prefer the full-screen experience in Windows 8.1. To be fair, Microsoft does not make option two very easy to implement. There is no toggle to turn the Tile section on or off as you might expect. Instead, a user would need to unpin each App from the Tile area until they are all gone.

Luckily, not many programs are listed there to begin with, and most users will likely leave at least some apps present. And why not? Live Tiles are fantastic.

How to enable full-screen Start menu in Windows 10 desktop mode

Philosophically, the Live Tiles are supposed to reflect 'Life at a Glance'. This feature is clearly inspired by Microsoft's Windows Phone and it is great that they kept it. These apps with Live Tiles are ideal for tasks like Weather, the Store, News, Sports, Photos, Twitter where you want to be able to peek at what is new without opening the app. For instance, Weather can show you current conditions as well as the week's forecast, whereas the News app displays the latest headlines.

This glance-ability is key to the Windows 10 experience.

Besides the Live Tile area, there is also a customizable section for quick access areas including Settings, Photos, Videos, Downloads, Documents, File Explorer and more. These quick access folders can be found under Settings and users can easily toggle which ones they want to appear. They certainly make it easy to access frequently used folders.

Microsoft has succeeded with the new Start menu. I don't find myself missing the Start Screen at all.

The Start menu can recommend new apps for you that you may be interested in and display which apps were recently installed. All of this is user optional.

In my opinion, Microsoft has succeeded with the new Start menu. Even as someone who enjoyed the Start Screen on Windows 8.1 I fully understand the criticism from desktop users. In fact, on my touchscreen-enabled Dell XPS 27 I never used the Start Screen nor touch. I find using Windows 10 much more advantageous than 8.1 for these reasons and do not find myself missing the Start Screen at all.

The new Start menu in Windows 10 is a winner. It brings back what worked, jettisons what hasn't and most importantly gives users the final word on its design.

Action Center

Notifications are nothing new having arrived with Windows 8.0 a few years back. However, what is new is the Action Center, which is a carryover from Windows Phone. Conceptually, a storehouse for all notifications and quick actions is not unique, and that is its strength. Anyone who uses Android, iOS or Windows Phone knows what this section does and why they would want to use it. Once again we are seeing the smartphone model carry over to PCs and desktops.

So let's break it down. There are two main areas: one for notifications from apps like Email, Twitter, News and Weather and another for quick actions to toggle on or off various functions on your laptop or PC.

Notifications now appear on the lower right of the display when they first arrive versus the at top style from Windows 8. These notifications are immediately viewable, and users can click them to open up the corresponding app. However, if you miss the notification, they are collected into the Notification Center, where you can view them later. This feature fixes a significant problem in Windows 8.1, which had notifications but no way to see them if they were missed.

Notifications for each app can also be configured individually. This option is ideal if you do not want to be interrupted. Users have three configuration options for all apps:

  1. Show notifications
  2. Show notification banners
  3. Play a sound when a notification arrives

I think this a well-thought-out design as it mimics the well-regarded system on Windows Phone. With these options, you can have a notification appear in the Notification Center for Weather, but not necessarily have it pop up as a live banner. Likewise, you can have the notification arrive as a banner, but it remains silent with no audible alert.

Settings are universal, so every app on the system – regardless if it is first or third party – behaves exactly the same.

I prefer this system for something like email, where I want to see what has arrived but not get a notification banner for each new email possibly disrupting me from my work. Since these settings are universal, it means each app on the system – regardless if it is first or third party – behaves exactly the same. That is fantastic.

The notifications on Windows 10 are robust, configurable and most importantly consistent. However, things could still be better. The discoverability of app notification settings is poor as you need to tap the apps' name under Settings > System > Notifications + actions and not the icon (which does nothing). It is just not very clear that you can configure app notifications with such fine detail.

Quick toggles

Down near the bottom of the Notification Center users can find quick actions for everyday functions. Users can tap the 'expand' arrow to reveal up to 12 toggles with the first 4 being custom choices. For instance, if you want a Bluetooth toggle in the top four, you can choose that under Settings. For my Lenovo Carbon X1, I want to have the Cellular toggle readily available, so I can turn on or off my LTE connection.

At least that is the idea. I have had issues with the cellular toggles not doing their job, and I'll chalk that up to some early release bugs. The rest of the toggles, however, worked without issue.

Other options include Display brightness, Battery Saver, VPN, Location, Quiet Hours and more. Quiet Hours lets you silence your notifications and alerts for all apps. Battery Saver disables power-hungry apps in the background and conserves energy to prolong your laptop's battery.

Conceptually I find the quick-action toggles and notifications very easy to understand, and I find myself often making use of them. I think users will appreciate how this tool works without any misperception.

Toggles are simple, and they make computing life easier.

The look of Windows 10 and Multitasking

With Windows 10 we can see Microsoft Design Language 2 (MDL2) a continuation of the Modern design principles forged in Windows Phone and Windows 8. Early on, fans of Windows Phone rebelled against the changes, but over the last few months, users have become accepting and even enthusiastic about the new design elements.

I know I have.

I liked the look of Windows 8.1 quite a lot and at first found the new Start menu off-putting. After using Windows 10 on numerous devices for months now, it is just the opposite. I recently picked up the Surface 3 with LTE, and I was repulsed at having to use Windows 8.1. This reaction was when I knew Microsoft was on to something with Windows 10.

With Windows 10, Microsoft is continuing to flatten just about every aspect of the UI that they can render. The whole OS looks like it was steam ironed. There are virtually no 3D elements or drop shadows or hints of three dimensionality here.

Even all the icons have been thinned and hollowed making them more minimal than ever. It feels lean and mean. The one area where we still see color is in File Explorer, which stands out as being different from the rest of the OS (even if they did update the icons to be more modern). There are also some odd inconsistencies with some icons being white for the Store and Mail, while File Explorer and Microsoft Edge are yellow and blue, respectively. This difference is not a bad thing per se, and it is likely to help ease people into transitioning to Windows 10, but it would be nice to see a little more consistency.

Old parts of the OS still can be found too like in Control Panel. The majority of the most common settings are now found in the new, ultra clean Settings app, but there are still some more advanced options under Control Panel. Microsoft is getting rid of Control Panel but for now, it and things like Device Manger still look like the "old" Windows. These artifacts reflect the amount of work Microsoft has had to put into in updating the OS, and clearly there is still some clean up left.

Another inconsistency is the myriad menu designs for various apps depending on where you click. It is a minor detail that most won't notice, but it does demonstrate that Microsoft has some contradictions to sort out.

In terms of customization, users can choose various accent colors under Settings and have these reflected on the Start Menu and Taskbar. Alternatively, you can leave the Start menu and taskbar dark, or let Windows choose an accent color for you based off of your background wallpaper. Although there is a good amount of contrast, using a light yellow color with a white menu can make text had to read, so not everything is perfect.

Windows is for multitasking

In Windows 10 users can still use the Snap feature to split an app on one side of the display with another on the other side. This feature makes working with documents or programs a breeze. Although Snap is not new, there are some improvements in Windows 10. For instance, you can now snap up to four apps onto a display. There is also a new 'snap assist feature' the lets you pick which app you want to snap to the other half of the screen. It is smart, works well, and makes one of the most important multitasking features in Windows even better.

How to use Snap Assist in Windows 10

Speaking of multitasking, the alt-tab method to switch between apps is still present with a nicer looking design. There is also a new Task View option complete with its own button on the Task Bar. This feature lets you get a meta look at your desktop and all apps running to let you easily choose which app you want to go to or even close it. Under Task View, you can also find the new ability to add more desktop views, which is even a better way to manage projects or to keep your social apps away from your work apps.

In conclusion, the new look to Windows 10 is keeping in line with Microsoft's minimalist, clean and high contrast approach to UI design. Text pops and the thin fonts with wire-frame icons give the OS a very modern look.

It will be curious to see how the general public responds to Microsoft's newly designed Windows 10, but there is enough here for Windows 7 veterans and those who enjoyed Windows 8 without offending either camp.

Cortana

Microsoft's Cortana is another feature making a jump from Windows Phone to Windows PC. First introduced with Windows Phone 8.1, Cortana is Microsoft's digital personal assistant and is more than just a search tool. The name derives from the holographic artificial intelligence character in the popular Halo game franchise and the comparison between the two is more than skin deep.

Cortana in Windows 10 at first seems like it could be gimmicky. After all, Microsoft is no stranger to assistants and invariably comparisons to Microsoft's infamous Clippy are made. However, this is 2015, and the technology has changed drastically. Indeed, Cortana is more than just a search engine with some flair, for instance, here are few things the assistant can perform:

  • Bring up the current weather, or a forecast in some other part of the planet, even on a specific day
  • Monitor your flights including delays, gates and the time you should leave to get to the airport in time, even considering live traffic conditions
  • Schedule reminders including location-based ones using a Windows Phone e.g. "Remind to pick up milk next time I am at the supermarket."
  • Notify you when to leave for home, work, or meetings/calendar events
  • Track your favorite sports team
  • Send an email using your voice including handling the recipient, subject, and body
  • Recommendations for news, movies, entertainment, concerts in your area, follow your stocks
  • Launch apps e.g. "Hey Cortana, launch File Explorer."

Many of these are referred to as "Interests" and they are filed under Cortana's "Notebook", which lives in the cloud. The language is meant to evoke a secretary working for a boss who must keep notes on your likes, dislikes, and general preferences. Just like a real notebook, users can access it and delete or modify any information they do not wish to share with Cortana.

This control over information and privacy is one of the things that set Cortana part from Google's services, which are more convoluted for data control.

Cortana's notebook is linked to your Microsoft Account and floats, meaning whatever Windows 10 machine you log into it has the same Cortana experience. If you already use Cortana on Windows Phone, the same experience passes to Cortana on the desktop and vice versa.

What makes Cortana exciting is the utilization of 'Hey Cortana' an always-on optional system by which a user can verbally call for the assistant using a desktop microphone (or a laptop's built in one). It uses natural speech, so you do not need to memorize commands like in the past. If users prefer, they can also bring up Cortana with a Win + C keyboard command for a quick search. It is an efficient system but if you have numerous Windows 10 devices around saying 'Hey Cortana' could cause a small ruckus.

How to manage Microsoft and user accounts in Windows 10

Cortana also resides in the system taskbar right after the Windows Start menu (this can be disabled as well). Just tap in the search area and Cortana springs to life with all of your latest interests.

I find Cortana to be one of the true gems in Windows 10. For people who do not use all of the assistant features, you are still getting very tailored news and entertainment content delivered as a mini-newspaper. What makes the assistant even more exciting is its evolving nature. Based on user feedback and ideas, the Cortana team is constantly thinking of new ways to make use of the technology but trying to avoid gimmicks.

New Cortana features are pushed through the backend, so it does not need a software update. New things just go live, which is also a problem for discoverability. Currently, Cortana does not tell you what new tricks it can perform.

Despite all the coolness of talking to our computers and phones, I'm not convinced that people will use Cortana to its fullest capabilities

Will people make use of the technology? Despite all the whiz-bang coolness of talking to our computers and performing tasks, I am not necessarily convinced that people will use Cortana to its fullest capabilities. I do think people are more likely to talk to their PC at home or in the office where privacy is more attainable versus in public on a phone.

However, there are still barriers to getting people to learn about and take advantage of all that Cortana can do. In that sense, Microsoft has some work cut out for them in bringing this feature to the masses. Even I find myself only half using most of the features although perhaps that is more a reflection of my lifestyle than personal preference.

Luckily Microsoft has started to roll out a 'how to' campaign within Cortana to help folks.

Cortana is not quite the A.I. genius behind Cortana in the Halo game franchise, but for 2015 it is likely the best we can do right now. Considering that Google and Apple's voice-assistants live mostly on phones or in a web browser, Cortana stands an excellent chance of becoming the default personal assistant.

Later this year, Microsoft is releasing Cortana on iPhone, Android, and even the Xbox One. Besides reaching a larger audience, this rollout enables more feedback to be collected on how people are using Cortana (and what they are trying to accomplish) improving the technology over time. In that sense, like Windows 10 itself, Cortana is a constantly evolving tool and its brightest days are still down the road.

On Windows 10, Cortana is only available for the U.S., UK, China, France, Italy, Germany and Spain. Cortana is also expanding to Japan and Australia, and in English in Canada and India for those on the Windows Insider program (early access). Later this year, Cortana will be available to Windows Insiders in Brazil and Mexico, and in French in Canada as well.

Microsoft Edge

There is no secret that Internet Explorer is one of the most joked about browsers today. This despite the fact that it is still one of the most widely used because it is the main browser in Windows. Internet Explorer though is ancient, and it is not built for the mobile world to which we now belong. Combined with its maligned reputation, it is no wonder why Microsoft would want to move beyond it.

Because of these reasons, Windows 10 is bringing a new web browser called Microsoft Edge.

I find Edge one of a fascinating aspect of Windows 10. Web browsers no matter how light and nimble always get worse with age whether it is Google's Chrome, Opera, or even Firefox. I have preferred Chrome now for many years because of its speed, design and browser extensions. However, even I loathe it as Google crams more and more into it. The core of the browser may be fast, but the bloat around Chrome Apps make it frustrating to use.

How to change Microsoft Edge's default search engine in Windows 10

Microsoft Edge is a chance to start new. Being able to build a web browser from the ground up has to be a liberating experience. This rise from the ashes approach is even more the case with Edge as Microsoft ditched IE legacy support too, something that they had originally planned to keep. Instead, legacy users can still find Internet Explorer in Windows 10, but it is buried within the system. (Need to find it? Just ask Cortana.)

The biggest improvements with Edge come from its new design, feature set, and being built to run on everything from PCs to tablets to phones. The browser has to be light, and it has to be efficient.

Design

Microsoft Edge has a very clean and minimalist look. It blends in with the general UI of Windows 10. In fact, one could argue that it is too austere, with little color or eye candy. According to Microsoft, that is by design as they want web content to be the focus of your eyes, not the browser itself, which should fade into the background. While I agree with this philosophy, Edge in my opinion could use a little bit more flair.

Edge also ditches complex menus and overwhelming options for the casual user. On the main Settings page, users only have around six choices. Under the rarely accessed 'advanced' settings, another twelve. When compared to Google Chrome, Edge feels like a breath of fresh air in terms of simplicity and design.

Edge feels like a breath of fresh air in terms of simplicity and design.

Microsoft brings live previews for web pages and even more color with highlighted tabs in a future update rumored for October, but for now, users are left with a perhaps a too-clean browser experience.

Users can also choose between Dark and Light theme settings. Microsoft says they were surprised by the number of users who prefer the Dark one, although it seems to be like an obvious choice. Interestingly, though, I prefer Light for my large desktop and Dark for my laptop for some reason. Perhaps having an option is a good thing after all.

Edge also brings a few new functions to make browsing on Windows 10 fun and unique; these include Reading Mode, Annotating web pages, Cortana, and Reading List.

Reading Mode

Reading Mode is not that new. It is found in Windows Phone and users of Windows 8.1 who chose to use the Modern version of IE could also access the feature. However, in Windows 10 is built into the main desktop browser and is readily more accessible.

Reading Mode simply strips away the chrome of a web page, leaving nothing behind except the images and text. The mode is enabled by clicking the book icon in the browser toolbar. There is even neat animation of flipping pages to let you know it can be enabled. It is a fantastic tool to use when reading a very long article as it removes all distractions.

Being able to choose background tones (Default, Light, Medium, or Dark) and text size also gives users just enough customization for their preferred reading style.

Cortana

Cortana is not just the system default search for Windows 10 it is also the first extension for Microsoft Edge. Microsoft built in the feature in a subtle but unique way: simply highlight a word and right-clicking users can choose 'Ask Cortana' to send the inquiry to the personal assistant. Nevertheless, instead of opening a new web page, the assistant slides in from a panel on the right side with the requested information. This function keeps the user within the original web page experience while also answering their question.

Cortana in Edge can look up information about a person, or give a definition just by using 'Ask Cortana'. Likewise, users can type in 'Weather + location' in the address bar to bring up current conditions, do simple math, and more saving you time without having to perform an actual search.

Another feature Microsoft is introducing is the ability to bring up information about a place, such as a restaurant. When on a web page for an eatery, Cortana will subtle notify you that it has more information, including directions, hours of operations and reviews. It is a clever usage of the assistant and it no way feels gimmicky. However, since it is still new, the feature only works in some major metropolitan areas like New York City, making it hit and miss for most users right now.

So far, Cortana is off to a great start in Edge, but like all the other functions it needs to time to gestate as Windows 10 grows.

Annotating the Web

In Edge, users can enter into an 'edit mode' that lets you draw on a web page (if your device supports a pen) or use the keyboard to add notes. You can then screen capture your work and share with your friends or family. The idea is an old one but applied to a new situation. Ideally, people will use to a collaboration tool when considering purchases, vacation trips, or anything they find interesting. Since the work is saved an image file, the receiver does not need any special software to view it. This neutrality helps break down and barriers that may prevent a user from adopting it.

I cannot say I am a big user of annotations in Microsoft Office, OneNote, or now Edge, but I do see the value in its function. At least it is easy to use, unique, and it serves a purpose.

How to use Web Notes on Microsoft Edge for Windows 10

Reading List

Finally, another new feature in Edge is the ability to save a web page for later reading. This Reading List is similar to other services that let you index articles instead of just bookmarking the page or website. To use Reading List, you just hit the Favorites star but instead of listing it under Favorites, you choose Reading List instead. Here the article and lead image are saved in order of date, making it easy to browse through your list.

I like the idea of Reading List, which is why services like Pocket are popular. However, the implementation in Microsoft Edge feels half-baked at this time. For instance, there does not seem to be any real synching between it and different instances of Edge on your other computers. So for now, your Reading List appears to be local, which has to be either an oversight, a coming feature or a bug (if it is supposed to sync). There is also the issue that this does not sync up to Reading List the app, which is a separate app that serves the same purpose but without the browser. That app works by "sharing" a new story to the Reading List app, which then categorizes the listing. You would think that the app and the browser would sync, but alas that does not seem to be the case.

Reading List has the potential to be a big feature, but for now, it remains only a good idea not fully realized.

Edge as a browser

Compared to the Internet Explorer duality of Windows 8 Microsoft Edge is a huge step in the right direction. Having two different web browsers was just insane. Sure, Internet Explorer is still there if you need it so in theory that could be confusing for some, but most people will never even notice. Seeing as the Edge and IE logo are similar, most users should feel comfortable with using it.

The browser itself is really good. I am using the majority of the time even over Chrome. I still prefer Chrome for one reason: extensions. Whether it is LastPass, Reddit Enhancement Suite (RES), Magic Tube, or AdBlock, Chrome extensions are a vital part of my internet life.

Later this year Microsoft is adding extension support to Edge, including porting over Chrome extensions.

The good news here is that Microsoft is adding extension support, likely in October during the 'wave 2' refresh for Windows 10. These are not supposed to be just proprietary ones for Edge either as Microsoft has detailed that Chrome extensions can be ported over directly to their new browser. It remains to be seen how well they can execute on that feature, but if they live up to their promise. Edge could easily overtake Chrome, Firefox, or Opera.

Unless you are married to Google and the tight integration of their services into Chrome, I see zero advantage to using it over Microsoft Edge once those extensions arrive. Microsoft has already boasted faster speeds for benchmarks, and this is just the beginning.

Any shortcoming in Edge should easily be fixed in the next year as Microsoft has built a very solid base in which to build off of for the future. For instance, I do find it hard to see which tab is active when I have 20 of them open with the Dark theme (yes, I am one of those people). I also prefer Chrome's omni-search bar, which lets you search within a website from a search. There is also the missing swipe gesture for forward and back (which is still coming). Moreover, yes, I have even seen Edge crash on occasion. However, all of these feel like beginner issues that will be solved over the next few months.

I would also like to seem some animations for when a web page is loading, maybe some vibrancy and how about some levity? Cortana is fun and so why not add some colorfulness to Edge?

There are few shortcomings in Edge, even an occasional crash, but overall it is a solid refresh for what looks to be an exciting new browser. If it is not the best now, it has all the makings to be so shortly. Microsoft should be proud of this accomplishment.

Apps, apps, apps

Although Windows 10 is an OS update, it is much more than that as well. Windows 10 has been app-ified with many core features broken down into the smartphone app model. This model is a wise choice for a few reasons:

  • You no longer need an OS update to fix broken native apps or add new features
  • Due to the prevalence of smartphones and their app stores, bringing that model to the desktop PC brings immediate familiarity to new users

In fairness, Microsoft had already started down this path with Windows 8 and 8.1. However, in Windows 10 Microsoft's first-party apps are even more prevalent and form a greater core of the Windows 10 experience.

Out of the box, new users upgrading to Windows 10 can expect the following apps:

  • Calendar (formerly Outlook Calendar)
  • Groove Music
  • Mail (formerly Outlook Mail)
  • Maps
  • Microsoft Phone Companion
  • Movies & TV
  • MSN Money
  • MSN News
  • MSN Sports
  • MSN Weather
  • OneDrive
  • Photos
  • Store
  • Windows Alarms & Clock
  • Windows Calculator
  • Windows Camera
  • Windows Voice Recorder
  • Xbox

Most of the apps like Voice Recorder, Alarms & Clock, and Maps are all relatively self-explanatory. This observation, however, does not diminish their aesthetic achievements. Alarms is shockingly minimal, which considering how important they can be may not be a bad thing. Voice Recorder, also barebones, is a simple go-to app to record audio with the ability to share, trim, delete or rename the file.

Maps is a gorgeous topographical tool that brings up your current location, can search for addresses or establishments and give directions for the car, walking or transit. It even features street side photos to visualize your destination. You can also share the information easily with your contacts including full directions with maps, which is ideal for email. The app is mostly geared for those who are mobile since it is a universal app for Windows Phone too. However, if you have a Surface 3 with LTE, you can readily use the tablet as a giant GPS tool, especially since you can download maps for offline usage saving data.

Speaking of, Maps is powered by Bing and Cortana so that saved locations and data is synced between devices.

Additionally, users have access to Office 365 with a traditional PC installation or utilize the new Touch Office apps including Word Mobile, Excel Mobile, PowerPoint Mobile and OneNote.

There is also a new music app called Groove, which replaces Xbox Music from previous versions of Windows. Functionally, they are the same but Groove does bring Windows 10 influences and a very clean, minimalist approach to curating our music catalog.

Everything you need to know about the Groove music app on Windows 10

The Groove app is still missing some much-needed features like gapless playback, but these and others should arrive in the future through the Store as an app update.

I have always been a fan of Microsoft's first-party apps, even if they are constantly undergoing reinvention. In this case, all the MSN apps have been rewritten to be Universal Windows Apps allowing them to run on Windows 10 Mobile and Windows 10 for PCs and laptops. The design of these apps also ditches the pivot (swiping left or right) for main navigation and they have introduced the more universally familiar 'hamburger' navigation menu (the three bars near the top).

All of the MSN apps were rewritten to work across Windows 10 Mobile and Windows 10 for PCs and laptops, and have been redesigned with more universally-familiar navigation.

MSN News, Weather, Sports and Money are likely to be used by many users right out the gate. MSN News simply aggregate information from other news sources, much like how Bing News works now. Users can add topics through Interests for various subjects and users can also track customized topics. For instance, Cortana and MSN News both follow news on Start Wars: Episode 7 and UFC for me, bringing me all the latest news from around the web on those topics. The interests in MSN News mirrors Cortana adding a nod of consistency between the services. Indeed, MSN News is a subset of Cortana, and they are all tied together by Bing.

Additionally, with universal logins through a Microsoft Account even those on iOS and Android can sync their interests between devices. This feature is part of the beauty of Windows 10 that it is still very device agnostic. Those using Android or iOS feel right at home. Indeed, when you plug in your smartphone to Windows 10, a neat Phone Companion app pops up to greet you. That app itself does not do too much, but it serves as a frontend for Microsoft's services. If you are using an iPhone or Android, it tells you which Microsoft apps you can use on your phone to match your Windows 10 desktop. These apps include OneDrive, Skype, Office, Groove Music, Cortana and more.

I suspect deeper integration is coming down the road for smartphone users, but for now, it is all done through Microsoft's services. Things like texting from your computer to your phone are not here yet and besides using File Explorer to manage your phone's files, there is not much direct interaction.

Mail and Calendar, which drop the Outlook branding on Windows 10, but retain them on iOS and Android, let users connect multiple email services. Gmail, Yahoo, Outlook, or a custom entry are all compatible. Likewise, calendar syncing is also present between those services.

Email is a very personal thing with some users needing the very powerful (and overwhelming) Outlook for Office while others prefer a more minimalist approach. Mail and Calendar fall in between as it is not overflowing with features, but it is more than just a basic app too. The design of the app is modular so that it adjusts to your screen size and whether or not you have it windowed. Users can even add their own custom background image for the blank panel that displays when no email is selected.

Microsoft has done an admirable job on their first party apps. Specifically, they do not feel half-baked like they did with Windows 8. Indeed, rumors claim that interns built many of those original 8.0 apps. Now, however, Mail, Calendar, Maps, Groove Music and more all feel like full-fledged apps with outstanding functionality.

Even better, these are apps like on your smartphone, so users can expect to receive frequent updates to add new features, improve performance, or fix any issues that may occur.

Store

App Stores are nothing new but Microsoft has finally done the right thing and merged all of their services into one Store for Windows 10. This unification includes stores for Apps, Games, Music, and Movies & TV all under one virtual roof. Now, users can buy a song, a TV show, and the latest Windows games all from the same app.

Besides unifying the separate stores, the app itself is completely redesigned with a more top-down approach as opposed to the previous left to the right style.

Whether you like the new store design will be a personal preference. However, with the larger, more professional app images, better information flow and the surfacing of related content, the store certainly feels and looks better from my perspective.

Like any store, clicking on an app or game delivers information about that software, screenshots, ratings and reviews, general information, and similar apps that people also like. Since apps and games are becoming universal with Windows 10 and Windows 10 Mobile, singular store listings are becoming commonplace with users having the ability to choose between Phone or PC for images.

Under Moves & TV, users can watch trailers, rent movies, or buy titles in standard or high definition. There are also built-in reviews powered by Rotten Tomatoes with cast and crew information. Prices are competitive although you may occasionally find something cheaper on Amazon.

Jumping into music, you can preview songs, buy individual tracks or whole albums. If you have a Groove Music Pass for $9.99 a month, you can also stream any album and even download them for offline usage to your phone, tablet or PC. However, this can a bit confusing as you can only use the Groove Pass in the Groove app, but it does nothing in the Music Store. The Music Store is just for buying music, but you cannot download tracks using your Groove Pass.

Once explained, this separation makes sense but if you are a Groove Music Pass holder, finding the download menu button in the Groove app is not evident. It took me numerous attempts to find it under the ellipsis menu. Additionally, you are allowed to stream or download songs to only four Groove Pass devices, and you can only swap out a device every 30 days. So make sure you read the fine print if you use several devices or change devices frequently. If you are not a Groove Pass user, then the Music store is simply a place where you can buy individual MP3s or whole albums through your Microsoft Account.

The new Store is a huge step in the right direction but there is still plenty of room for improvement.

Overall, the new Store is a huge step in the right direction but there is still plenty of room for improvement. For instance, apps and games do not reveal which version number they are on nor when they were last updated with a date stamp. I also still find the divide between Groove Music the app and the Music store a bit confusing as well, as noted above.

Nevertheless, if there one awesome feature that I like about the Store it is the ability for it to update itself through the Store. Indeed, we have seen Microsoft roll out numerous updates over the last few months, and we are sure there are many more to come. These updates can only mean that today's shortcomings will be gone tomorrow. Stay tuned.

Windows Hello makes passwords obsolete

In this day and age passwords are a way of life. Even more so since many of us with sensitive data opt to use the strong but cumbersome two-factor authentication. I will not go into details about my password but let's just say it is more than ten random characters and a rather large pain to enter in each time.

In the past, companies have gotten around this through things like fingerprint scanners and facial recognition. Lenovo is a big proponents of this as their Yoga 3 Pro's camera can match your face, and my X1 Carbon has an effective fingerprint scanner.

In the past, companies made their own fingerprint scanners or facial recognition cameras. Microsoft's building that in with Windows 10.

Windows 10 though is different as it integrates these functions into the OS directly, and this is called Windows Hello. On an X1 Carbon, this means you do not need to use Lenovo's proprietary software. Instead, you can jump to Settings > Accounts > Sign-in options and set your fingerprint there. This feature certainly makes the OS much more efficient.

There is also optional facial recognition, which relies on Intel's RealSense camera technology. Many of us at Windows Central are using a developer camera called the F200, which can be purchased for $99. However, you can already buy some laptops with RealSense cameras built in, and many more are coming this year. (I suspect Microsoft's Surface Pro 4, expected this fall, will feature it).

The RealSense cameras rely on RGB (traditional cam), infrared, and 3D. This is not just matching your 2D face to a photo, but rather the contours of your face, regardless of lighting conditions. Yes, it works in a dim room too. This tech means it is much more secure, works in more conditions, is much more accurate and significantly faster. Indeed, average unlock times were one second or less, which is quicker than me typing in a long password or even a pin.

I did have occasional issues with the F200, including it not turning on when the computer wakes from sleep (something I sort of solved here) and every once in a while I did have to recalibrate. Luckily recalibration (and even initial setup) takes less than 30 seconds. It is astonishing technology.

It is more than just signing in to your computer too. Windows Hello, both for fingerprint and facial scanning, works for buying things in the Store. Like most marketplaces, Microsoft asks you to type in your password before you make a purchase (oddly, this cannot be yet overridden in settings). Instead of typing in your password, though, you can just swipe your finger or look into the camera.

How to set up Windows Hello facial recognition in Windows 10

Microsoft does plan to roll out Windows Hello to their Passport initiative, although details about that project are still unclear. Microsoft has also told me that at this time they do not plan to open up to third-parties meaning not to expect LastPass integration. That is a bit of a shame and hope some middle ground can be found, although they cite security concerns as the reason for the decision.

What happens to my Windows Hello data?

An obvious question in this day and age is what does Microsoft do with your facial mapping data or fingerprints? The short answer is nothing because they do not have access to it. The biometric data collected by Windows Hello lives on that PC and not in the cloud. In fact, it never leaves your computer. This inability is why users of multiple computers will need to set up Windows Hello on each device as it does not roam with your profile. The actual data is encrypted on your device, and even if a thief stole your computer and managed to reverse-engineer the encryption, they still could not use the data to unlock any other computers (or at least would find it extremely difficult to do so).

All in all, I find Windows Hello extremely useful. Using a RealSense camera makes you feel like you are in the future as the computer winks at you once you are recognized, unlocking your PC to do business. In an age where time is important, shaving those few annoying seconds – especially if you enter the password in wrong – lowering your stress level and making you more efficient.

Even more interesting is the prospect of Windows Hello coming to Windows Phones, something that is expected this fall. This is cool stuff, folks.

Stream Xbox games (Restrictions may apply)

One feature that sounds amazing on paper but is a bit of a letdown is Xbox game streaming. The idea here is that you can stream any Xbox One game to a PC, so long as you are on the same network.

The system is very easy to use. Launch the new Xbox app, which is excellent by the way, connect up to your Xbox through the app and enable streaming. With an Xbox controller connected through USB to your PC, you can control and play games from your Xbox.

Being able to play Peggle 2 on my Dell XPS 13 laptop? Just awesome.

Xbox One game streaming is awesome. But it also monopolizes the console and your favorite media might not be available.

What is not great, however, is that game streaming means you are mirroring your Xbox One. This renders the Xbox useless for anyone in the living room as all they see is someone playing a game remotely. If you run cable TV through your Xbox, you cannot even watch it.

Sorry married couples, but will still need two Xbox Ones if you truly want to be able to play games while your spouse channel surfs.

You also have to be on the same network due to bandwidth concerns, so no, you cannot use this at work (unless you can work from home). Moreover, if you are in the U.S. forget about streaming media like cable TV or my beloved UFC TV app due to media rights issues.

I get we are early stages of this technology, and I suppose dual-streaming (one to the TV, the other to a PC) is possible. For now, unless you are alone in the house game streaming may be less exciting.

I still find uses for game streaming e.g. in my office with three displays. I do not have an Xbox in here, so this means in the middle of the day I can take a break and play a quick game while I still monitor Slack and Twitter. That is damn cool.

However, for now, I am afraid game streaming will find a limited audience.

How to stream Xbox One games to Windows 10

Continuum

As explained earlier, Continuum is one of the new features that people with 2-in-1 devices can leverage to make better use of that hardware. At its essence, Continuum changes the OS from a tablet usage scenario to a desktop version and vice versa.

The OS in tablet mode ditches all mouse and opts for a full-screen experience. On the taskbar, Cortana shrinks to just an icon but takes up the left side of the display when accessed. There is also a nice back button reminiscent of Windows Phone that lets you switch back to the previous app. The previously mentioned Task View is there as well to let you quickly manage running apps.

The Start Menu also grows into a Start Screen in Tablet mode. It is not quite as expansive as the version of Windows 8.1, which had an infinite sideways scroll. Instead, you are left with a finite space for your Tiles. If you need more apps, you need to tap the hamburger button near the top left corner.

There are also some nice gestures like swiping from the left to access Task View and swiping from the right to bring up the Action Center for notifications and quick toggles. Swiping down closes an app. All of these are dead simple.

In general, the tablet experience in Windows 10 is good but not great. It feels like Microsoft leaned heavily on improving the desktop over tablets and to be honest, that is understandable. However, I did not care for the hamburger menu and app list, which has a jarring refresh that makes you think you did something wrong. Touch elements are mostly right but in areas like the Store I found menu items a bit smaller than I would like, including tapping your photo for your account or swapping between store sections.

It feels like Microsoft leaned heavily on improving the desktop over tablets and to be honest, that is understandable.

Also, I find it odd that although this feature is called Continuum it is only referred to as Tablet Mode in the OS. I think this is a minor complaint though as obviously users will likely hunt for tablet mode instead of Continuum.

Windows 10 is also very smart about this whole desktop versus tablet mode. For one, you can override it at any time with a simple toggle in the Action Center. You can also have the OS ask you each time you add or remove a keyboard, or set a default so that it always changes or never changes modes. I think this let's leave it to the user is the right approach. The OS holds your hand through the process in an elegant and smart way.

Ironically, of all my Windows 10 devices the Surface 3 and Surface Pro 3 have had the most issues with the update. Nothing major but just odd quirks related to Continuum and orientation switching. I am not too concerned though and I plan on adding Windows 10 to my Surface 3 LTE tonight as soon as it is available.

The Good, Bad, and the Ugly

Now that I have covered the main new features of Windows 10 let me talk about what works and what doesn't.

The Good: Insider Program

Microsoft has done an admirable job of fixing the mess from Windows 8 and 8.1. However, instead of just guessing at what people wanted they did something unique: they crowdsourced data. The Windows Insider program was set up to let users get an early look at what Microsoft was building. However, instead of just being onlookers, Microsoft built in ways for users to rate features, submit recommendations, and vote on new ideas. This program is not to say that Windows 10 is 100 percent determined by nerdy power users. Microsoft did have ideas and plans, but they used user feedback to help guide them along the way.

The Windows Insider program, which does continue after today, is a brilliant move, and I think it has paid off with Windows 10. The OS feels polished, is very fast to launch apps, and is more stable. Not only have they fixed things, but they added useful features as well e.g. Cortana, Action Center, Windows Hello and more.

How to switch between fast and slow rings on the Windows 10 Insider Preview

The Good: All the new Windows 10 features

Whether it is Cortana, the new Start menu, the Action Center or even the overall look, Windows 10 is an astonishing upgrade. I mention how I was not too enthused months ago and yet I now find it hard to go back to Windows 8.1.

Perhaps a better way to say this is I do not find much in Windows 10 poorly thought out, ugly or lacking a real function. Many of the multitasking features and the new Start menu are true tools to help you work.

Microsoft is right. Windows 10 is for people who do.

The promise of universal Windows apps, integration with other Microsoft services, and Xbox game streaming are all fascinating consumer features that I think real people can use. True, I find Xbox game streaming a bit of a novelty but it is an impressive novelty that I think will get more robust in the future.

The Good: Windows 10 is a platform and service

At the very beginning, I outlined how Windows 10 being a service was a dramatic change from the past. We can talk of 'final' builds but in reality there is no such thing. Windows 10 is now just Windows, and it will constantly upgrade and improve through OS and Store updates. This approach is radically different from the giant but infrequent OS updates in the past.

The fact that Microsoft can constantly develop this OS, especially with the continuation of the Windows Insider program, means this OS is just going to get better. Even if you have issues today, I feel confident that I do not have to tell you to wait six months. A few weeks should do it, at most.

Microsoft is a consolidated, lean, mean machine, and Windows 10 reflects this transformation.

Finally, with Windows 10 going to phones, wearables, the Xbox One, HoloLens, and mini-computers with no displays, the OS is one of the biggest platforms ever to launch. The potential here is massive, and it is thrilling to see what comes next.

The Bad: Upgrade or Fresh Install?

In experimenting with doing an upgrade from Windows 8.1 to Windows 10 versus a fresh ISO install, I have found that each has advantages.

Upgrades are nice since they keep your working drivers in place if Windows 10 ones are not yet available. When I did a fresh install on my Dell XPS 13 it took quite some time to get Cortana working by realigning speech recognition, language, and locale. Downloading the right speech language pack was particularly frustrating as it is so buried. Same with the microphone. On my Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro, I have not yet figured out how to get it to recognize Continuum after a clean installation.

Surprisingly, my Lenovo X1 Carbon, Dell XPS 27, and HP Spectre x360 were relatively fine. I did have to install drivers manually with the X1, but Lenovo now has all of them Windows 10-ready. Dell has plenty of Windows 10-ready drivers for their 2015 XPS 13 laptop, but my 2013 XPS 27 so far has nothing.

In short, I ran into fewer problems when I did an upgrade than a clean install. However, there is something to be said about doing a fresh install and overall, performance seems a little bit better. Plus, you get that nice cozy feeling of a clean computer. Just try to download the driver packs before you wipe your computer as you can save yourself some energy later.

In the end, I would not put too much emphasis on either option as the update process has been pain-free with no crashes or nerve-racking scenarios. From cursory reports and our experiences, as you would expect, computers with older hardware or AMD graphics have more driver than machines from 2015. OS updates are never a 100 percent safe adventure, but Windows 10 does go a long way in working out of the box.

The Ugly

Nothing.

I know that probably seems too generous. However, I cannot find any show-stopping reasons why if you are on Windows 7 or Windows 8 you should not upgrade. To get Windows 10 to run everywhere, Microsoft had to strip it down, meaning it should run very well on older hardware. This update is not Windows Vista with the graphics-intensive Aero Glass situation.

Additionally, whatever issues I have pointed out in this review are likely to be gone in the coming months. We know 'Threshold wave 2' is due in the October-November timeframe, which brings browser extensions and further low-level OS optimizations. Moreover, with WaaS, we should expect a steady stream of updates and new software in the Store.

Windows 10: The Verdict

I have spent a considerable amount of time with Windows 10 these last few months. I am now running the OS on six PCs all without any major issues. On the contrary, I love the experience. Windows 10 is delightful. It is fun. It is smart.

What an exciting thing to see Windows 10 arrive and to see people gush about Microsoft's latest creation. Because this time, it is 100 percent warranted

Microsoft has finally found its way again and they are just getting Started. Welcome back, folks. Now get doing!

Daniel Rubino
Daniel Rubino

Daniel Rubino is the Executive Editor of Windows Central, head reviewer, podcast co-host, and analyst. He has been covering Microsoft here since 2007, back when this site was called WMExperts (and later Windows Phone Central). His interests include Windows, Microsoft Surface, laptops, next-gen computing, and arguing with people on the internet.

371 Comments
  • Just letting ya'll know I am the first commenter and the one true king of windows/phone.
  • I am the prince (FYI) :)
  • Congrats /s..
  • shoot, i guess that makes me a duke....
  • How bout I'm the true god of windows/phone... :P
  • Nah king is better.
  • Why be a king when you can be a God..
  • nice said.  Why be a king when you can be a God.. my fav song. RAP GOD.
  • Because a King has a physical presence.  People are constantly disputing the existence of gods. 
  • You are Steve Jobs??? :P (btw. RIP)
  • You will never ever catch a virus on an apple... But you can still afford a Doctor if you buy a pc.
  • That's a false statement.
  • there are viruses on mac. the user would need to install it. This is also basically what happens on windows. i haven't read about any viruses that can work without user interaction on windows for a while.
  • I see what you did there ;)
  • But Windows Phone will change the name into Windows Mobile. :P
  • Does any one know if we can do a clean installation of windows 10 after the upgrade? if how give all the details please.
  • They have ISOs available, so yes. There's an article on this site with info.
  • use a tool to retrieve the windows license key. download the iso file. do a clean inatall using the key. i believe with newer computers the key is in the bios and you won't have to enter it
  • Well just so you know, I'm the king of CrApple HATER and MS/Windows/Phone loyal lifetime customer. Hope Win10 put CrApple iOS and OSX trash where they belong, inside the trash can. LONG LIVE WINDOWS
  • Some problems here: 1. Edge browser suddenly stopped showing images for me expecially in Twitter. 2. I still can not activate WiFi hotspot in Window 10. It's greyd out on me and can't be clicked. Any help?  
  • Can your device not be a wifi hotspot? There is always that... Or it just isn't enabled yet? Secondly with edge, try resetting it. Atleast deleting all your privacy data(cache, history, password, ect.) it's pretty easy to do from the history menu.
  • Edge does not support Java, so if your favorite website has heavy java stuff, well your better of using chrome browser or something instead..
  • Chrome doesn't support Java.
  • Explain.
  • That edge is god awful.....why bother??? crashes every 5 minutes
  • Never crashed with me and it's my main browser.
  • Nope. I find that HP, for one, has abandoned all its pre-August 2013 buyers with Windows 10. Their website says you can get NO more downloads from them, and to wait for Windows to fix your problem. Or not. Bugger off.
  • Stanis is the one true king!!!!
  • HODOR...
  • I am the Ruler of Z, Windows/phone and Z, apple is the foolish
  • Congratulations...
  • You sir, truly seem faster!
  • I reserved...but no win 10 yet...why? Anyone know? And, before anyone asks, my pc is more than capable and after I reserved a copy, it said so. Checked windows update, but no go....ideas?
  • ISO
  • get the windows 10 media creation tool from Microsoft. easiest way to install the update.
  • Your a boss!
  • The comments section is so broken
  • This article is about the Windows 10 desktop version, can you please be the first commenter when Cityman and Talkman is launched in Fall 2015? Only that day I will see if you're the true king of Windows 10 Mobile.
  • Daniel even left phones off the list of devices in the Win10 universe. Hmmm...
  • I guess that makes you special then in your own little mind. Yay to you for having the most useless content of the day. I hope you get toilet water splash back in honor of your great achievement.
  • I will become one of your subjects when the 950xl releases ... leaving my Note 3 behind 
  • Does windows 10 desktop allow you install the desktop Onedrive folder? I haven't upgraded yet
  • So, anybody here know how to customize your Windows 10? I found the best guide here: http://www.windows10insider.com/2015/08/how-you-can-customize-windows-10.html
  • I am the 357th and I am legend. Posted via the Windows Central App for Android
  • If you want qi, get the Tylt Vu one... its good.
  • The real gauge will be enterprise adoption. Why? Well cause money. With most companies just now deploying 7 it will be a challenge. Hope their refocus helps them rake in that enterprise dollar.
  • Enterprises typically have Volume Licensing agreements, they don't just buy 10000 retail licenses. There are other deployment costs though (testing, training) which sometimes also align with purchasing new hardware.
  • I'm sure the enterprise market will begin to adopt 10 by the end of the year considering all of the built-in security enhancements alone.  Either way MS will contiue to dominate the enterpise market.
  • The company I work at will start testing Q4.
  • Don't like quick Actions ( 1 quick action in one line ) can I remove it ? Even on my windows 10 mobile
  • You can either have 1 line or the expanded 3-4 line version of the Quick Actions, you can also customize which actions appear when collapsed and expanded, but you can't just remove them.
  • There is no option to remove it, so you either get the 1 line or expanded state. Though I don't why you don't want it.
  • Unfortunately your options are don't use it, expand it to 4 rows, and/or customize the toggle button layout.  It works like it does on the phone preview in regards to customization.
  • That last image... perfection. Also, this is the kind of review you read with a nice cup of coffee. Great stuff Dan and team.
  • True, a very well-written article, though I read it so keenly that my coffee didn't even get cold haha.
  • +L950 ... Good work Daniel.. I'm eager to read such a W10M review in the feature..
  • You are back, Sam??
  • Bring on 10 mobile!!!!
  • The last picture almost made me cry, it couldn't be more majestic than that.
  • Completely agree. In fact, I had to stop reading for a moment just to post a kudos comment. Excellent article.
  • Windows 10 Forever. Congratulations Daniel. From Brazil, from site Windows Mania.
  • Just upgraded... This Edge browser is fast!!!... Love 10 so far.
  • How, did you get 10...did you recieve an email after reservation telling you your good to go, or what?
  • I'm downloading it now on my laptop and I clicked on the flag at the bottom of the screen and followed the instructions, it should ask you to continue to prep your machine then when you want to install it.
  • I have it as well.  I reserved my copy a while back, and I kept checking Windows Update.  I saw the message at 12:30am.  I believe Windows Central wrote an article about how you can make the update start now.
  • After noticing in the ReportingEvents.Log earlier in the day on 7/8 that the installation files had successfully downloaded, around 9:30 pm pacific time on the 28th I was able to get the installation to start by finding another update to 8.1, installed it and once I restarted I got the notification that Win 10 was ready to install. As I mentioned, the Edge browser seems much faster than ie11 but after using it in tablet mode on my SP2, I don't like the UI in tablet mode. First off, it was much nicer browsing full screen as in 8.1 modern ie11 (screen real estate is limited on a 10" tablet).  I don't like the task bar always there at the bottom and same the the navigation always there at the top. Also, navigation is much more natural to me at the bottom in tablet mode as I tend to hold the tablet from the lower sides... this makes it natural to just swipe up with my thumbs and control navigation, favorites, recent, etc. It is sad that they changed this and I'm hoping they bring it back at least as an option: hide navigation and taskbar while browsing, navigation top or bottom... theses would be great choices. Other than that, there still seems to be some bugs at least on the SP2. For instance it is running hot and the fan is constantly running and causing battery to drain fast. Also, when I plugged into the docking station with a much bigger screen size, things such as the system tray didn't resize properly... icons in the system tray were pixelized and open windows were part way off the screen. These are just small bugs that I believe will be ironed out soon or maybe go away when I finally do a clean install. Anyway, I have been testing 10 on my desktop since the beginning and it's awesome. I only tried it on the tablet since last night and my main complaint is the browsing which I am hoping they will add options in the future. Other than that it's great!!!
  • Edit to my previous post: 7/8 should be 7/28... no I did not get the download 3 weeks ago, sorry typo! Also I wanted to add that I restored the power settings defaults and the heat/fan problem seems to have gone away. Also, the resizing problem from desktop to tablet mode seems to be working now except that I can't get to work automatically and some other minor bugs with Edge. I still don't like the Edge in tablet mode... it's just not natural to me although I realize it is a work in progress. I really hope Microsoft gives the option to have the navigation at the bottom and hidden until an up swipe.
  • Can't wait to install... I'm just so anxious and nervous at the same time lol.
  • Mine up to date.disappointed.
  • Friends tell me Wich date windows 10 launch for Lumia 640 xl
  • I can't get the windows 10 update in my lumia phone guys..?? Help me plzz..??
  • Help you with what? W10 mobile hasn't been released
  • Shh dont tell them
  • Likely during the 'Threshold 2' timeframe in October/November
  • Please read the multiple articles on this website and others that say Windows 10 will be released for phones within 2-3 months anfter it does for other devices.
  • Haven't slept all night, waiting for a prompt to ask me to upgrade to Windows 10 :P
  • Did you get it yet?
  • Just download optional Windows 8.1 or 7 updates, restart your machine, do Windows Update search again,, and you will get the prompt. (Repeat if necessary, I had this issue too).
  • ^^ Thanks guys. I tried thrice. I used that command prompt thing that I read from the comments section in one of the articles here at Windows Central to manually force the update. Then while installing, it would show some error and a KB number. Then I deleted all the contents from C:/Windows/SoftwareDistribution/Downloads then tried again (again following someone's idea from the comments section). Still the same thing happened. After the 3rd time, I got so frustrated and shut it down and went to sleep :D Just woke up. Will try again tonight :D
  • Yes you are too generous Rubino, I thought you would bring something about how some elements on UI are inconsistent but anyway, good review, looks like you have been writing it for some days. that's always good! Hopefully media will treat Windows 10 as it deserves, it's a good upgrade and it's free so most people shouldn't complain about it, especially if you will receive new features without paying a cent. that sounds perfect to me, even if they couldn't complete some features for release. It seems like Windows 10 is going to have a bright future, and can't wait to see what they bring to us, phone users. with univesal apps and even continuum for phones. I am sure some people will complain and say they will stay with XP or 7 forever, but I am sure it will be a great release and future updates will make it better.
  • Completely agree. Win10 is good; really good. But it is hardly perfect, and elements of it are obviously rushed. This is painfully obvious if you enable dark mode (and who wouldn't?) which only darkens some elements of the OS. Still, it is certainly good enough where I am telling all of my friends and family to upgrade.
  • I was waiting for some talk about UI inconsistency too, like all the different context-menus, back buttons, search spaces and column layouts, and lack of personalization. But maybe it's good to focus on what W10 is doing right, since it really needs to do well this time. So, i hope all these elements get fixed in the next months. Talking more about apps inconsistency, I even tried to make some mockups of how some things could be fixed, I'll let it here if someone wants to check ;) http://forums.windowscentral.com/windows-10-pc-laptop/367541-apps-concep...
  • All i'm going to say in the complaint department this time is the following: I find it ironic that people complain about the bloat in Chrome and other browsers, but clamor for extension support in Edge. It's primarily all the extensions that create the bloat that you are complaining about so why do you need those extensions so badly in Edge. And, While 10 is a nice OS overall, it still rubs me poorly when it comes to the touch UI. I don't want to upgrade to Win10 on my 8" venue tablet. 10 just doesn't do touch as well as 8 did. If they could bring swipe gestures to Edge and bring back a lot of the touch and swipe geustures from 8 to "tablet mode" in 10 I wouldn't be hesitating for the upgrade at all.
  • TL:DR   Kidding, just going to take awhile to read it all. Have loved it on my SP3 since 10158 made it actually usable on here.
  • Will continue reading later. Its too long. :)
    But...
    What does someone like me who liked Windows 8.1 a lot think about all the changes?
    I even use Table mode when they moved the Full screen start menu in the settings.
  • I like Win8 on my Surface 3 and desktop.  I like Win10 on my laptop a lot more than 8, and 10 on my Surface 3 is just as good but different.  Some things I got used to with 8 aren't there or are changed in 10.  So far nothing bad.  Just in that initial getting used to it phase.
  • Man! I need a laptop ASAP! All that hype and coverage is killing me. I want both laptop and Windows 10 running on it! And what a huge review. Gonna read it later, because I'm going to bed.
  • Are you ready for a miracle?!
  • Oh! I know you've already said this before Daniel, but I don't remender anymore. Any ETA for the updated WC app for WP?!
  • They badly need to fix the Windows 8 PC version of the app. Its plagued with ads and they cover UI elements. Its unusable. Also theres no way to remove them.
  • I haven't had any issues with the app on my Surface 3 or Lumia 920, 1520, or 930.  However, it has been a long time since it was updated.  Maybe they're working on a Windows 10 universal app.
  • Can't resist for 45 minutes!! India
  • Most intense and in-depth article ever on Windows Central. Great read as I await for my Windows 10 notification to upgrade. :)
  • Here's to hoping that W10 or WaaS leads to mass adoption which in turn leads to app development which in turn leads to universal apps for WP10!!
  • Several critical features from Windows 8 are still not implemented in WIndows 10, and deserve a mention, this is my "The Ugly" list. Note that these all worked on Windows 8 and there was no reason to remove them, nor is there a Windows 10 workaround for the same functionality. If anyone knows of a way to do these, let me know. * cannot reorganize live tiles at the group level * 3-wide, vertical layout is a waste of space compared to Windows 8 when using wide or large tiles * lack of view options for all apps list. Name only (no category, date installed, etc) * no way to access settings charm or app menu for windows 8 apps. This means that every modern app is completely broken on Windows 10. * no "show more tiles" for start menu * no close gesture from task switcher. Close button is inadequate for touch use  
  • All good ugly points. I'd also like to add OneDrive in file explorer being utterly useless compared to 8.1. Unless they bring a similar thing into Xbox Video, or whatever it's now called, than they do with Xbox Music, I'm pretty lost as to how to manage it. The way I see it is I have two options:
    Put every single file into it's own folder, or
    Roll back to 8.1 on all my devices.
  • Agreed...OneDrive, especially on low storage devices, is useless...no one wants 1:1 syncing on them. Heck, I don't want it on my Surface Pro 3...going to give it a whirl on my home server though.
  • My point exactly - why have they removed this option?! They've reduced all the awesomeness of OneDrive 8.1 to a very basic app with the likes of Dropbox. This feature was a must for me - rolling back to 8.1 aswell. Shame on MSFT - if it aint broken don't try to fix it. 
  • Woah. Hadn't considered the modern app settings charm... They can't have over looked that, surely?
  • No they didn't, anything that used the charm has a button added to the top in the title bar that acts as the charm menu.
  • it's really hard to activate in tablet mode, but I did find it. It's not perfect, but it is a valid workaround, so we _can_ cross that item off my list.
  • I would suggest you take up these with via the insider channel :) 
  • Actually I saw somebody already posted this but still no action and very few votes unfortunately. But yeah, we need this again on feedback! We need to bring it with October update!
  • A good list, except the 4th one listed about "no way to access settings". As far as I can tell all Windows 8 apps have a little hamburger menu in the upper left corner that can access the features that used to be swiped in from the right. Now I will say that this feels weird because often it opens up the side panel which is technically not there. I think as more apps are made for Windows 10, this issue will go away. 3-wide layout is stupid I agree, though the tiles can be placed almost anywhere which is a big improvement Agree strange the all apps list doesn't provide options like that, though it works for my needs. I thought the task switcher just let you swipe down to close an app - I'll have to try with my tablet when I get home.
  • Thanks for the info. I did figure it out. THe hamburger menu is normally hidden when running in tablet mode, but it is there. If you do a slight swipe from the top, it opens up the app menu and gives you the hamburger menu (I usually swiped from the bottom) -- swipe too far and it activates the snap UI, which is what I was getting when I tried it before. I will update my original post.
  • I can't edit my original post, so I just want to say "thanks" to those who showed me how to get to the settings charm and app menu. Item #4 is no longer an "ugly" :)
  • I am happy to report that I can remove another item from the list. If you tap on a start menu group name to edit it, there is, in the upper right, a grip (looks like a two-bar hamburger menu) that can be used to move groups around on the start screen.
  • It has been already released.... I read a.m. By p.m mistakenly
  • The time has come! The Game changer is here!! Welcome to Windows 10...
  • Terrific, comprehensive review, giving both the satelite and street level perspective on the key innovations.   Live Tiles are fantastic!  There's a discussion in the WC forums from an OP's suggestion that W10M incorporate some of the newer Android elements.  But there's so much window-dressing in and around the same old static squares and rectangles, however now finely wrought, that in comparison to the fluid and updating Tiles that my preferences become stronger by the day.   Maybe Microsoft is still playing catch-up on aestetics and design taste (but Windows 10 in all its iterations is pretty!) but they have taken the lead.   Information and prioritization at a glance.  And the glance is largely formed by individual choices the user makes across a wide array of apps and resources, rather than the more push-to-passive-consumer model imposed by Microsoft's rivals.   I can see what's going on in my world at a glance at my W10M phone, and I look forward to bringing this same, syncronized capability to all my devices.   After working with the desktop and phone technical previews on my home devices for the last few months, I can't wait to begin the campaign to bring them to my work desktop and networks.  Windows Hello promises relief from the tyranny of security, where, until this point, the manufacturers and programmers seem content to burden the user with ever greater complexity and obligations to protect themselves from hackers.  I will upgrade to Windows Hello capable hardware as soon as its practicable, but until then, I'd settle for perifferals that bring the capability to existing hardware.   Daniel Rubino obviously put a lot of long hours and effort into his review, and a whole lot of careful thought.  It really stands out in this review.   Thank you and congratulations. 
     
  • I'd say discontinuing Media Center and lack of native DVD playback at launch should be part of the ugly.Sure less and less people are using DVD playback nowadays, but for an OS that touts backward compatability, it seem like a glaring omission at launch.   As for Media Center, there is no alternative out there that is pleasureable and easy to use and it's dissappointing for people who forked out money to add it to Windows 8.x.
  • I agree. I spent a LOT of money on my Media Center PC, because I don't want more than one computer taking up space in my house. I use it for everything, including streaming live OTA TV to Kodi on my FireTV. I haven't found anything else that can do that. Lately I've found myself wishing it had Cortana, though. It's very disappointing.
  • There is a free DVD Player that MS is offering those who had Media Center:  http://microsoft-news.com/microsoft-releases-windows-dvd-player-app-for-windows-10/   As for Media Center - I totally understand where you're coming from.  However, since you've purpose-built your PC for Media Center, there is no reason you need to upgrade.  Just keep running Windows 8.1 with Media Center until MS no longer supports the OS (many more years of service).
  • Wow, I'm gonna goto sleep and pick this up in the morning lol *yawn* Looks to be an action packed reading adventure!
  • Very well written review Dan.... It definitely brings out the need for using Windows 10 ASAP! As of now awaiting the prompt on my PC for my reserved Upgrade. Praying the world sees the light and upgrades as well!
  • Thoroughly enjoyed reading this article Daniel, and I hope it finds it's way (even just slight references or parts of your review) onto the vast open web for every man's perusal, whether they be sceptical or just curious about Windows 10, I am an avid reader of your articles and even I found some new bits of info within this review, well done Daniel, well done Microsoft and let's enjoy this beautiful time together (I know its just an operating system, but it's a one I care deeply for) :)
  • How long does the whole upgrade take from the start? Trying to decide if I should go to bed or not while waiting..
  • The download itself depends on your internet connection. It took me 20 min. The install portion takes another 20-45 min depending on the speed of your PC.
  • Please tell me what I do to get windows 10 in my Lumia 640 xl phone...how can I update
  • You wait until it's released.
  • But window phone 10 kab ayega
  • Last quarter of 2015.
  • The ugly: No more Windows Media Center for my PVR needs. But I love (almost) everything else. (It could better retain my snaps in tablet mode.)
  • I have 4 PC's in my home that run Media Center (thanks to the free activation key at the Windows 8.1 launch). I can afford to lose WMC on all but one of those computers where I do 99% of my TV viewing via CableCard protected content. I have 3 other relatives who have a single computer in their respective houses which runs WMC and serves Xbox 360 extenders in their living rooms. None of those family members will be able to experience Windows 10 until a suitable replacement for viewing protected TV content is available. Maybe HDHomeRun DVR will be that replacement, but it won't be available for a few more months.
  • Since you/they have purpse-built PCs for Windows Media Center, there is no reason to upgrade to 10.  Stay on Windows 8.1, which will be supported for many more years.
  • that was a long long read.. a good one though..
  • Just had to say, this is one of the best, if not the best review I've ever read. Congrats Daniel.
  • Good review. I prefer clean installs as well... So I will be rolling out my update to my computers a little slowly... The dell venue pro 8 and surface pro 3 being first... I have to test thing a little more with my production machines. Very happy with where things are going... It is more about the service ans the experience. This is why I like this ecosystem... It is inclusive for all and any... Not walled.
  • Yay it is finally here. Just got my notification. Lol
  • Anyone know what is the size of w 10 pc when live upgrading win7 to w10 pc??
  • Anyone in the US get the update yet?
  • Just waiting on Skylake. I'm hoping the Threshold 2 update will also be out by then. Oh, and also the Lumia 950. And the Band 2. Wow, it's going to be an expensive fall. :)
  • I actually like Windows 8.1 a lot. I know a lot of people find it strange but still it had its good things..
  • Okay now that's done, #AskDanWindows please :)   (kidding, I'm making my way through the review now, thanks)
  • I LOVE win8/8.1 and i never give a crap what bunch freaking cry babies were booohoooing about. NEVER had ANY issues with it and its been one of the BEST OS IN THE WORLD for 5 PC i own. Of course, Win10 is even even better with more features and options, and directX12, Edge, Action Center, Cortana, Multi Desktop,.......and many more. So Best just got even Better. However, mark my words, there will be bunch of more whining cry babies CrApple iSHEEP lovers, and Google fanboys, will do and say anything to bad mouth Win10 in anyway they can, just like Win8/8.1. You'll see. Their job is to make Win/MS look bad in media's eyes, so people buy CrApple and Android/Google products. These bad mouthing has worked great for both CrApple and Google, and it will NOT stop with Win10. Bashing will continue. 
  • I feel bad for you.
  • That was too large article!
  • Holy shit Daniel. The most thorough review that I've read from you yet. Thanks for the read, it was well written.
  • thanks, glad you enjoyed it!
  • I've had it on my SP3 now for about an hour and ... I think I love it. Mind you I haven't had a chance to really put it to the test by working on it all day. But the upgrade was amazingly painless. All install files had downloaded already over the last few days and the actual install took maybe 40 minutes. This is my first time using Win 10 on a 2-in-1 as I've been using the preview on an old old laptop. It seems totally fine for tablet to me. Switching between apps was simple. I won't be using the tablet mode, though. Dinks up the start menu layout too much. If tiles fit on the substantially smaller desktop mode Start menu, they should certainly all fit when full screened. It's definitely been a big plus to get use to Win 10 over the last two months on my other laptop - switching to it on the SP3 everything looks beautiful and is so much faster. I'm going to miss playing the windows feedback game though (I know it's still there - but there's no way it'll be as active). If current experience holds, I'll definitely be recommending updating to friends and family.
  • Have you tried closing apps on your SP3 using Task Switcher. It merely minimizes them.
  • For a device with as much ram as a SP3, thats not even an issue.
  • Closing from task view closes for me, both desktop & tablet mode.
  • Well done Daniel, you nailed it. Great article. Threshold Wave two is already visible from shore. #UpgradeYourWorld
  • Still waiting for Windows 10 Mobile to be released. I'm the only one in my family who has a Windows Phone and not a Windows PC.
  • Great review Dan! It was long to read but it was worth it. This article should help people to upgrade to Windows 10 and it is great. I really like where Microsoft is heading now but still bit worried what will be the final judgement of general users, even though its generally positive, there are still some things that Windows 10 didn't manage to bring with launch (which they might come with October update). I think only one think I just don't agree on one point, is the statement "Specifically, they do not feel half-baked like they did with Windows 8." Though Windows 8 apps at launch most are abysmal, but it doesn't even mean that some Windows 10 apps aren't half-baked, some not all. The best apps so far they included with are MSN Apps, Mail and Calendar, OneNote (I don't know why this isn't mentioned), and Xbox app.
    Half-baked or bad apps are: Photos, Groove Music, Movies & TV, Microsoft Edge and worst of all People app. Fair enough some of them are mentioned to be lacking on so many features. Also to add, Groove still needs better design layout on some areas, specifically the Artist page (where the artist shows all of its songs, not the browsing page) and Now Playing which I think needs to be inspired from Zune. Still this is a great release and I hope that they will address tons of issues and missing features in October update, after that I will be more confident to recommend everybody to Windows 10. Cheers! P.S. Almost done downloading the upgrade files. :) ​  
  • Yup, I see your point and perhaps I could have gone into more detail about the apps.
  • No problem. Maybe we'll just have review about the individual built-in apps in the future. ;)
    Btw I re-read the article​ and you actually mentioned OneNote once, sorry.
     
  • I'm not a fan of Groove either that's why I just downloaded the Zune player on my desktop and tablet http://support.xbox.com/en-US/xbox-on-other-devices/windows/download-zun...
  • Me too! I got still a Zune also for my desktop. Also is it usable for tablet? Zune got a tiny controls, its really designed for desktop usage. Anyways, I wished Groove Music will look something like this the concept I got. :D http://i.imgur.com/4RmhZY0.jpg
  • Um, paragraph 2... "Windows 10 is not just a new OS but an entire platform that very shortly will span PCs, laptops, tablets, wearable accessories, holographic computers and even the Xbox One." So, no mobile then, Daniel? Now to read the full article with interest (even if I'm supposed to be working)  
  • I have, to say, developping for windows 10 is just magical. Sharing 100% of code between pc, tablet, mobile, hololens, xbox, and iot, is truly a revolution. Next step, is when Microsoft manages to integrate Xamarin into the deal, so that one can developp apps for litteraly any mobile and desktop platform (except mac os X, but wgaf?).
  • Next step is to release W10 to more than just PC.
  • This was a good read, Daniel, though I cannot shake this feeling lately when reading your articles that I am reading an MS PR release. No matter what they do, everything is super cool and fine and so on. I get it we are all fans here, but maybe you drunk a bit more kool aid than i have. Anyway, just a subjective obesrvation. On to the real topic: Windows 10. I am a Windows 8 fan and still somewhat skeptical about Windows 10 as it feels like a step back for anyone who liked the full screened Win 8 experience. I haven't installed it yet, though: i know it is supposed to be good, but it just feels alien and i just keep circling it, poking it with a stick. Reading the reviews so far, though, i have a few of those "uglies" you couldn't find: With MS resources there is simply no excuse for still having fragments of XP style old menus/screens and dupliucations (settings vs control panel) as it has been 6 years since they started work on Win 8. I cannot believe they did not have time to do a facelift for the Control Panel, for example and add it as an "advanced" menu of the new Settings screen.   Cortana this, Cortana that, except 99% of the countries of the world don't get it. How come my friend's old Galaxy S2 has Android updated with Google's speech recognition in e.g. Hungarian, our admittedly small language, yet MS is still only bringing out Cortana for some major languages and has no announced timline for the rest of us at all? I know Cortana is geo sensitive and needs to learna region not just a language, but I would take a limited feature set over nothing.   Hidden Live Tiles. The very concept of Live Tiles is that they are always visible, so I just glance at my screen and see the new information. Now these are hidden in a Start Menu. Bravo. Also, i have a feeling this decision will make the appstore and the apps even less recognized by mainstream users which will not do any good for the number of apps/developers.
  • eh, I thought I gave a lot of criticism in this review, everything from Edge to notifications to Cortana. I content though, and Thurrott agrees with me here, that the good far outweighs the bad. Going further, this rapid release cycle gives the feeling that any minor bugs/issue we are experiencing will be quickly patched. In the end though, I'm certainly not going to apologize. I mean, have you read the WSJ review? I think it was more gushing than mine.
  • Yes, they are all gushing. I'm loving it. Let's see what they have to say about 10 mobile.....
  • This was more a general obesrvation that has been bubbling inside me for a while now. Please don't take it as an attack, it's just an addimtedly subjective observation from someone who reads most of your articles on this site. Lately, whenever I read any new MS rumor or change in startegy, I can't help to think: "cue for Dan's article explaining how absolutely awsome this is" no matter what it is. And it may just be that you developped strong ties to your MS contacts, they tell you about all the stuff for months and how hard it was and you come in pumped up... To be more specific though, i think you could have listed some "ugly" here. Like the Reading mode feature where it feels like they had a team develolping the Reading app, not talking to the Edge guys so you have 2 features almost the same, but almost worthless on their own as the real feature would have been portability: i mark sg. for reading later and i can pick it up on my phone in Edge as i go to work, or using the app while i am on a plane to read it offline, etc. Also for the duplication/jarring design inconsistency between settings and control panel. This is an example of something that has been with us since Win 8 - they have been working on that since 2009! This may be MS's most important product release ever, due to the impact on the future of their core product, so when you finish every other feature description with "... but it will surfely be fixed/released with an update later" i think you are giving them a free pass on too many things. Still love your work though, not hating here :)
  • They didn't "waste" time with Control Panel since the most important features were put into Settings. The Control Panel is for legacy support only. There really was no need to "pretty it up". Eventually it may disappear though could be far down the road. You like Live Tiles, I like the Live Tiles, but unfortunately many do not. So they de-emphasized the focus on them. It isn't so bad, but one only can fit so many tiles on a start menu anyway.
  • I can fit 72 medium tiles on the 1080p screen of my Surface Pro 2 running 8.1, but only 30 on the higher resolution Surface 3 running 10 in tablet mode. I still fail to see how showing fewer tiles in a larger screen area counts as a benefit.
  • RIP live tiles, long live hidden tiles. Posted via the Windows Central App for Android
  • My first article in reading mode on edge after I upgraded.  Couldn't have said it better
  • hah, indeed an appropriate usage!
  • Hmmm.... My insider copy post upgrade still shows Windows 10 Pro and Windows is Activated in Activation screen. Did I just land myself a free copy of Windows 10 without being a beta tester for life...
  • Something you completely forgot in your review: universal touchpad commands (1 finger= move pointer, 2=mouse wheel, 3=show/hide desktop(up/down) alt+tab (left/right) , tap 4=action center, tap5= cortana.  Those things are useful, and I've only had the OS for an hour
  • Yeah, was going to mention it but also remembered most users do not have Precision Touchpads (those are the only ones who get those options). It'll be a good followup article though.
  • We'll have plenty of individual feature break outs and tips posts coming. Dan had to draw the line somewhere with the review!
  • excellent writeup! the whole process for my SL410 has been quite slow, started downloading from the mediacreationtool @9:28 and it's now upgrading windows at 48% and it's 12:13 and it would've been nice if we had the option to choose between x86 and x64 but can't beat a free OS update....and started the download process for the x205ta after the SL410 finished downloading, so i'll let it finish overnight....
  • Apple must be shitting themselves.
  • is any one have issues with this page in the app
  • Yep-this article won't open, causing app to close on my phone.
  • As an insider have to say that this is it, here it is, and will stay for long...long live Windows 10. :)
  • DirectX 12?
  • Great article. I like these in depth articles. I would love to have more of these in Windows Central.
  • @Daniel Rubino:
    Thank you very much for the Ballmer quote ("Three screens and a cloud").
    In my opinion it was incomparably visionary back then and i think it's sad for Ballmer that Nadella is harvesting what Ballmer sowed out (which could simply be bad luck, but people give Ballmer unfair sh*t all the time, ignoring the beneficial things he did for Microsoft).
  • Congratiulations on this very nice article. I'm eager to try win10 on my home laptop to evaluate the OS. If it's any good (and I really think so) I'll ask I.T. to upgrade my work related laptopt too. 
      Besides that, I really think it's a shame that a lot of the features (Cortana for example) are not yet available in Belgium/Europe... Considering the marketshare they have over here for Windows/Windows Phone and the market share they have in the U.S. they should put some more effort in keeping up these features in Europe! (I do know that in number of devices the market share in U.S. is still more important than over here).   Conclusion: I like the great idea behind the new OS and the services related to it, but Microsoft, please step up and roll out all the nice features globally instead of U.S. only...
  • I hate how they force you to use bing with no option to change to google! So frustrating!!!
  • We have a how to for changing it to google in Edge.
  • this 10,000 words 'Windows 10 Review' Article force closes WindowsCentral app for windows phone
  • I'm reading/typing this through the windows phone app
  • Yep, I can't open the article either.  Lumia 928.  WP8.1.
  • Same here. And haven't gotten any article notifications for 3 days either. This article still at top of list on my phone..
  • Oh M Y   G O D !! Daniel .. This is truly E P I C !!! I ENJOYED THAT ! REALLY SO nice & professional ! 
  • Can't wait,  I have 3 computers to do the upgrade to.   Can't wait to get them all running and fresh.
  • Another great review.
  • "Windows is for multitasking."
    "The Internet is for p**n."
  • I don't like the new "pill" like toggles not at all. They are in so stark contrast to everything rectangle and sharp in the design language. They just feel like they want to please Android fan base and like a big finger to Windows 8.x users. And to hell with the fucking startmenu. I never missed it in Windows 8.x The tablet mode is fucked up beyond repair in Windows 10. Every app now has to implement the 3 core contracts that the charms bar held themself: share, print and settings. And every single MS app put them in a different place. Thanks for making the live of developers and users alike more difficult.
  • Agreed. While there are some awesome things to admire in W10 the poorly thought out design language and backwards UI are not. Hopefully MS will realize that the one size fits all approach and copying other OS' bad designs wasn't a good idea.
  • Agreed. It seems that MS decided that tablet mode = running desktop application in full screen mode. This is just retarted. The size of the hamburger menu on my Surface 3 is 5mm x 5mm (.25" x 0.25"). Try hitting it reliably with your thumb. Who on earth did the useability study.  Same goes with file chooser. Directory up button is the same size. No forward/back swipe gestures in Edge, you need to fish for small buttons at the top of the page. Incidentally why do I even need to see adress bar and other buttons when I am in tablet mode. IE is even worse menu bar and toolbars show up. Cortana button again is tiny. Not being able to have 2 wide/large tiles side by side in one column on Start menu.  I can go on on.  
  • Beautiful review.. I got thrilled!
  • My keyboard and touchpad stopped working Tried reinstalling the drivers but it didnt fix it. help ????
     
  • Go to your manufacturer website and get the correct drivers.
  • Patience is a virtue. Should have let it get drivers during install. Literall every driver on 3 machines was updated during the install. I think most people having those issues are the ones who wanted to rush the install and didn't allow the installer 5-10 more minutes to download updated drivers.  That is one area Windows seems to have improved massively on. 
  • Just did an upgrade from 8.1 on my Surface Pro 2, works like a charm! I absolutely smash love it!! <3 <3 <3  And OMG you can now have different screen DPI so screen one (surface) can have 150% and the monitor on the dock can have 100% been waiting forever for that little feature! :D  
  • Wow, awesome review Daniel. Very well done!!! I'm saving this to PDF for posterity hehehe!
  • I have windows 7 home basic product key.
    Can I do a clean install?
  • Yes.
  • No update for me yet, I thought I was a Windows Insider (because I had used the preview on a previous machine) but I guess not.
  • I''ve got Genuine WIndows 7 Ultimate , got it with Dell Inspiron 520s back in 2010. I want to know how can I get Windows 10 ISOs so that I can do fresh install. Do I need new key for 10 or use 7 Ultimate ?
  • You can input your Windows 7 product key.
  • W8, 8.1 worked fine for me, it had a desktop and did what it should !! I still remain confused as to why it was so un popular... Maybe because I am able to spell my name or count to 11 ?? Duno but non the less I'm installing w10 and will go back to using a desktop just as before, maybe the dumb asses who got confused by 8.1 will have more luck with 10 but somehow... I doubt it.
  • 8.1 was fine, it was 8.0 that was the problem
  • Force close when opening this article by the app, c'mon Jay​
  • Takes sometime to load the article (Lumia 730) . Maybe because low RAM issue...though it has 1GB. Btw ur phone model?
  • I love Windows 10!! I fell in love with Windows again. Sure Tablet Mode needs to have those 8.1 touch features back but I suspect in time.
  • Halo doesn't need to be in caps, it's not an acronym. If you want to differentiate the word Halo from the rest of the article you can use "Halo" or 'Halo' or maybe even Halo© at a stretch.
  • ...
  • Thank you for this well detailed and objective review of W.10.    
  • I noticed three columns of tiles....how did you do that? Mine only allows two?
  • Definitely not upgrading until they bring back Onedrive placeholders. That feature is great! And now I set things up so I can't work without it. Really sucks! I was excited for W10.
  • Excellent article! It is a comprehensive, informative and an enjoyable read. (Sidebar-congratulations to the first commentator, your speed reading skills are impeccable.) I too, really liked what W8.1 became, especially how it evolved from W8. My experience with W10 has been very good, and I think that MSFT is well on its way to accomplishing the "many screens" paradigm.
  • When is windows10 for phone coming
  • The ugly: File Explorer on Tablet mode... How is possible to forget that?
  • This is a great review.  I almost agree with everything you write, Daniel, but to say that there is "nothing" in the "Ugly" column?  The fact that they butchered OneDrive sync/placeholders in Windows 10 warrants the change to be listed in the Ugly column.  And then remove the Start menu sync???  That's a huge fail because there's no reason they couldn't make that optional.
  • Hi everyone,  I have a Toshiba Encore tablet, I updated tody to Windows 10, even I turn off the password requirement after wake-up, when I leave the tablet for a couple of minutes, turning it back on, it always requires for the password. What should I do to turn the password requirement off? Thanks for yout answers.
  • Excellent review Daniel Posted via the Windows Central App for Android
  • Got up this morning at 5:30 EST and upgrade not available yet :( and checked again at 7. It says that it will let me know. I even tried to use the command line script with no luck. My ...Sources file has 4.7GB in it, so I don't know what it is waiting for?
  • I am a Windows Insider (have been since the beginning) and have yet to receive the prompt to upgrade. Hoping to get it! Great review. I might revert to the ISO if I don't get it by the weekend. I'm too busy during the week to be worrying about this lol.
  • Boy, is this article huge! And that's why I think this is the reason that everytime I open this article on the app it takes about 15secs to open it and as soon as it does, the app crashes. That's why I commenting from the website. Anyways a really great article Daniel, some great takes.
  • I don't think they are aware of this issue, but the same is for me.  It didn't crash the app the first time I opened it, but now it sure does.  Crazy.  Someone should look into this.  I too am posting this from my laptop instead of the app. 
  • I was reserved my Samsung PC for windows 10. This morning something updating automatically I can't find it what was it in update. More than 2.5 GB data consume in update. Then no action by PC as smooth as was. It's my Win 7 Home Basic. So, thought to restart my PC but as its gone in restart massage displays on screen " please do not power off or unplug your machine. Installing update 1 of 1"... And, now its almost 4 hrs past still it's in same state. My data speed now reduced on 64 kbs from 3G speed as per plan. Almost above than 4 GB cross till now. What should I do now? Please any help? Thank you. In India.
  • I was able to stream media from my computer to other devices in Windows 8.1 by going to charms/devices/play to. After upgrading, I cant find it. Please tell me how to do this in Windows 10. 
  • Action Center -> Connect
  • This entire review can be compressed into Shia LaBeouf's motivational speech
  • Windows 10 pro Dutch up and running, msdn subscription. Installing GT 730 driver was a bit problematic, run Windows update first to get the latest patch. After that everything is fine. Edge is great.
  • Neowin has an article in which they are saying that they have used windows mobile 10 continum and also some images.i am very excited after seeing those images worth checking those images
  • False. They did not use it, they saw a demo of, which everyone in the media saw. Continuum for phones is still not complete and the hardware they showed (phone, tv, miracast) was all for a staged demo. I know because I was there ;)
  • Wow Dan, hat is an awesome article, and I have only watched the videos. Watched in preparation for W10 download and did learn some new functions there. I must say I think Microsoft has done an amazing job here by covering so many different user scenarios. Brilliant work, just brilliant!!!!
  • I didn't get the update till now
  • Pentru lumia535 cînd apare Windows mobile 10?
  • Long live windows ! Long live Gab, Joe, Daniel and all Team insiders...
    #Windows10 #DoWindows10
  • Windows 10 sounds soo good. Gotta wait until my 32gb USB comes through so I can make a recovery drive, just in case. Whatever happened to the nice and simple repair disk?
  • Daniel, Thanks for a really well thought out and in depth look at Windows 10. One commenter said that you were gushing over anything Microsoft related.  Forget them.  If you like what you see, then it will come out in your writing, which it does.  If they want a different perspective, I do believe that there's something called the Internet, and there are just one or two sites which may offer a different opinion.
  • Daniel you are an amazing journalist.... You now go down in my book as a Microsoft Hall of Famer, wont be surprised if they award you with something down the line. You are the next generation's Paul Thurton.... and your team is great..... love the guys at Winbeta too.... But your dedication is absolutely insane.... I wake up to articles everyday lolol i dont know how you do it... and you are almost the first to it every time.... And my favoirte thing is that you stay postiive about Microosft, which i think is super important because i know for a fact that Microsofties read Windows Central as much as anybody, and it helps when there is someone on the outside rooting on people in the inside... You're like the CEO of the External Microsoft community
  • lol, thank you
  • This^ Honestly this article could be one chapter of a doctorate thesis! Well done Dan!
  • Congrats Daniel and all Windows Central collaborators, this is an excelent review. 
  • My Lumia 830 is acting weirdly after resetting technical preview .it's not responding at all .would it be covered in warranty @Daniel rubino
  • Well that was one long article xD. good job Daniel very good info
  • Great review!  I agree with you 100%. However, I already see other reviews out there that are just shy of bashing the new OS.  I wish people would just TRY to be a bit more unbiased. Oh well, loving my Windows 10.  Can't wait for it on my Lumia Icon.
  • Fantastic review! Thanks Dan it was a pleasure to read it :) can't wait to update today ...
  • i have genuine windows 7 32 bit, can i upgrade to windows 10 64 bit since my laptop supports it?
  • For those who have reserved the Windows 10, but download did not start yet....
    Open command prompt in admin mode(run as administrator).
    Run this command - wuauclt /updatenow
    Windows update will start downloading windows 10 files.
    For me it started that way, in progress right now...
  • Love 10 apart from Groove Music not able to stream music from Onedrive. Need to sync music to actual device. Hoping for a fix soon. Nice article.
  • My issues are very few. I need to be able to rename my Favorites Bar items or turn them into Icons only using right click, that is driving me crazy. I should be able to drag and drop websites to the desktop as shortcuts. And by far my biggest beef, is that you cannot create and email to groups of contacts with the new Mail app, unforgiveable, but I'm sure it's coming.   One more, my 83 years old Mom has been forced into the Skype for desktop app because MS decided to discontinue the touch based app BEFORE they released a new one. WTF were they thinking, my Mom is totally lost on the Skype for desktop, she can't use it with her fingers anymore as we patiently wait for Skype to be built in to the OS in a finger friendly usable form.      
  • wow!!! THIS IS REALLY LONG.... but worth reading though. took me the whole day to finish reading it, cos i was busy at work and excited about window 10 at the same time... great work dan, great work...
  • On "upgrade vs. fresh install" - why not both? :) You can do a fresh install for the clean computer feel, and use Zinstall to bring your apps and settings and files (those that you want) back. Here's their tutorial for programs transfer to Windows 10, pretty useful: http://www.zinstall.com/how-to/how-to-upgrade-to-windows-10-without-losing-your-programs-and-files
  • Wish I had known that beffore I had my W10 nightmare 
  • When is any tech site going to address the obvious downgrade that Win 10 forces on Tablets? Less screenspace for content due to always on taskbars and no full screen web brwoser. These features are way less touch frindly than chamrs were. Missing Swipe commands like flip through open apps, the current taskviewr is a UI nightmware for touch devices.   Also your Pin to start Metro IE tiles aare deleted when you upgrade, these are different then favorite in Metro IE you can pin to start web sites. In Win 10 you can;t import them anywhere and they get removed.
  • I want my one drive place holders back. I will have to stay on 8.1 cause I use this feature every day and don't want to give it up. Posted via the Windows Central App for Android
  • Am I the only one who can't get the update? I've tried the wuauclt.exe/updatenow command and still nothing.
  • Excellent review!  Well done. The Mail app has a small, annoying bug (at least on my machine).  Reply All to an email and it includes the sender (you) as another recipient, thereby giving you duplicate emails of your reply (one in the Sent folder, the other showing up in your Inbox).  Hopefully MS can fix that on the next go-around. Other than that, I've been enjoying Win 10 so far.
  • No Windows 10 for my Surface 2. :'(
  • Fantastic review! I have just upgraded from Windows 8.1 to Windows 10 Pro without any issue.  The upgrade took ~40 minutes to complete on a Surface Pro 3. So far so good.  
  • And see, I thought I was the king of long-winded! ;-) But in all seriousness, great write up, engaging read, and I'm with you almost lock step on your assessments of 10. It's a great OS, and it's a really exciting time.... only the beginning of the very exciting times, actually! My main PC already had Insider build 10240 on it (I was an insider from the very beginning), so this won't mean much for it. But my wife's Lenovo all-in-one will make the upgrade today from 8.1, as will my Nextbook Flexx 11 2-in-1. So it's still exciting times in my household! I didn't hate 8 by any means, but I certainly didn't love it either. I am very excited to be able to move up to 10 on the Flexx, and am excited to see Jodee start using it for herself too, and see how she feels. HAPPY 10 DAY!!!!! :-D p.s. I shared your article on Facebook and Twitter. Will probably share on G+ too, only I almost never use G+ anymore. Posted via the Windows Phone Central App for Android
  • My first installation on a SP3 was flawless. Operationally, I've had trouble keeping the Hey Cortana feature working. Best thing I've noticed so far: the Windows Central website works much better in Edge than in IE11.
  • so far, it kinda drag for me.... awesome animation without glitches and lags but when explorer open, it taks a while to load. Plus my groove music keep on adding music at each open, even when all music is added  
  • Surface 3 Experience so far - Upgrade went fine but oh my god, moving apps around in Tablet Mode (with my fingers or the pen) is HORRIBLE. Sometimes the apps don't move at all, often they do not go where you've put them and to say it's sluggish would be an understatement. I'm glad of a tablet mode; I was always annoyed by the desktop on my Lumia 2520 and it's good that it's locked out, but the experience of organising apps would drive a newbie to tears. It worked perfectly on Windows 8.1. I persevered, but I was regretting the upgrade to begin with. Uninstalling apps was also problematic; they'd either re-appear at the top of the screen or simply refuse to unpin or uninstall. Also, in portrait mode, the tablet mode shows only a long thin column of apps - i'm hoping there's a setting I've missed but it's ugly so far. Teething troubles, of course, and I love the start menu on the desktop (which i'll upgrade tomorrow) but I was hoping Win10 would be more like WP8.1 in tablet mode.
  • Wonderful article
  • The best and most detailed Windows 10 review on the internet, Daniel please sticky it to the top for at least one week so that people can refer it.
  • This must be one of the best reviews I've seen on the Internet to date about Windows 10. Not a fan of the Windows Phone interface at all, but the PC version has gained my attention. Will give it a go and finally upgrade from Windows 7. Thank you for the review.
  • Seems a little bit better.
  • Guys. Your images. Control them, please.
  • Where can I find the mentioned one drive app? Its missing and the sync option available is crap! ruins my win10 experience :-(
  • Me too, wtf happened to it? This is huge.
  • Already got my windows insider short from the ms store
  • Holy moly. I'm only about 2/3 through the definitive review and I must say it is definitely definitive. Excellen write-up. Clapping hands - bravo.
  • I feel like I just read the whole bible on Windows 10.
    Great OS !
  • Windows 8.1 is still live and active on our mobile phones, so I don't appreciate reading that it is dead. Start with Updating this app thats crashing on windows 10 preview for phone.
  • Be aware, Windows 10 does not have Easy Transfer anymore. If you buy a new computer and you want to move all your existing apps, data, and settings to it from your old PC, you will need a tool such as PCmover from Laplink.
  • Daniel, Regarding the Edge browser; do you have any inside information if swipe forward and back gestures will be added in future updates? I loved that functionality in Internet Explore Modern Browers in Windows 8 and 8.1 as well as in Windows 8.1 Mobile. I terribly miss it so far using Edge the last few months during the Insider Preview. Also that functionality isn't available in the mobile version of Edge on Windows 10 mobile.  That was one of the thing that made IE Modern feel like a forward thinking browser for the new mobile and touch age. I feel like it'll be a step backward if Microsoft doesn't implement this functionality somewhere down the line. This was one of my request in the Insider Feedback and I've even tweeted it to the Windows 10 team in the Reddit forms.  Please tell me that at some point this will be added back!!
  • Anybody having issues with copy/ paste screenshots into emails?
  • This comes across a bit Fanboyish.W10 is a good foundation for being really compelling OS experience in Threshold 2, or maybe Redstone next year.  But at the moment its too glitchy for mainstream and Serious Business  users.  Just ask Mary Jo Foley, why she is not upgrading from Windows 7, and only her W8.1 Laptop.  That is the opinion of most serious users, upgrade from W8.x but not from W7.        
  • Fantastic review, but as I stated sometime back I'm going to do a little more reading before I make the jump from Windows 8.1 to 10.
  • I very much dislike when articles get pushed perpetually to the top in WP app. Then I'm never notified of other news and sometimes assume I'm already caught up because an article I just read, like this one, stays at the top.
  • Which features of the windows 10 work on the surface pro 3?
  • Upgraded from 8.1 on my sp3 and it says I need to activate!! It tells me I cant activate. What should I do?
  • Why do I still have WMP? I have all the updates installed on W10.
  • The sign in system is broken. On my tablet if I set it to lock immediately when I leave the device (like when I press the power button to turn the screen off) it effectively sets the machine to auto login. You can turn it off and leave it for 7 hours like I did today and the device will go straight to start when you swipe up.        Glaring security/privacy bug. What was the point of the Insider Program if this kind of stuff makes it through??? Universal Apps are about as robust as MSDOS apps developed with debug.com. They crash all the time. ALL THE DAMN TIME. They start up and just disappear. I don't find them usable at the moment. They crash too freaking much you never know when you might be 2 pages into a word document and the damn thing just crashes to desktop on you. The store crashes all the time as well.  Too much AdWare in the OS. The start menu is riddled with ads by default, your lock screen has them (Maybe Amazon was onto something with Special Offers?). There are unnecessary apps littered on the system.  When did Candy Crush Saga become preload material? It took like an hour just to make this thing not feel like a Verizon Android Phone with all the crap being shoveled through it and the way the store insists on reinstalling uninstalled bloat ware. Get Skype. Get Office. 3D Builder (FFS. Are you serious?).  The new Solitaire is a subscription Adware so I uninstalled that the minute my install was finished.  --- Upgrade was flawless otherwise. All my drivers were upgraded during install. Performance seems improved.  I don't like the bad contrast and the window decorations. It can be very difficult to tell which window is active and the title bars seem overly thick for what purpose they serve.  This is going to sound cheesy, but their new Calculator Universal App is amazing, Lol.  Cortana is nice. Her integration in Edge is nice. Edge is fast and loads practically instantaneously. The new Camera app is a big improvement (Face Tracking, better options).  I think this would have been a home run with the messaging apps, but the user experience across devices is still broken without them.  Action Center is 3 years late but works well. I like how you can share from more desktop components now.  You can basically turn the OneDrive app off if you want (Unlink, set to not start on Windows Boot). File fetch is back, but placeholders are gone   I gained 7-8GB of space back on both my Tablet and Notebook with the install (after cleaning the OS and deleting the old Windows files with disk cleanup tool). I think the 64 Bit Win7 laptop I upgraded gained back about 12 gigs (it was a fresh install of Windows 7 Home Premium). 9/10 Desktop 3/10 Tablet - the sign in issue makes it a non-starter for me. My Windows tablet is reset and retired until that is fixed. 
  •   Forgot to add. My touchpad is amazing now. It's like 85% of a Magic Trackpad in smoothness. The most massive benefit from the update, IMO, and probably single handedly worth it Lol I was literally shocked when I started using it after the upgrade and seen how good the multi touch gestures, pinch zooming, scrolling and even 3-4 finger gestures were. It was like I got a completed trackpad hardware upgrade.  But my BT mouse works now without BSODing my laptop (probably thanks to updated BT Stack drivers) so I will only be using the trackpad on the road. 
  • Looking forward to W10 phone to coincide with my W10 PC and HP Spectre! Love it so far.
  • Why wouldn't Windows 10 RTM build X86 Install on my XP laptop?  I created a bootable USB stick and it still didn't.  It says "not a valid Win32 application." Any help anyone?
  • Dat review tho.
  • Awesome... so the one thing from this review I was most interested in (Ask Cortana) doesn't apply because Cortana isn't available in my region. You would think a company of over 100,000 people would be able to get their shit together and actually provide worldwide features for their Worldwide launch.
    As it stands I have a notification centre I'll never use and a start menu I'll never use. Well, at least I can search from the task bar now, so that's cool. Oh, and for some reason I have to actually download everything from OneDrive if I want it accessible from File Explorer, not at all what I wanted, I just wanted it to live online and allow me to access it from there, I guess that is too difficult though (that being said, if I am wrong about this for the love of Christ let me know, because the whole reason I use OneDrive is so I don't have 60GB of music on my hard drive).
  • Hi...regarding OneDrive....you are not wrong...it is indeed the case that you have to download stuff to your local drive....this realm sucks. However, I believe this will be dealt with sometime later in the year. The other thing I found is....unless I am missing it....i cannot stash the One Drive folder onto my MicroSD card.....if I could do that at least it would help....if anyone knows (Daniel/ Richard?) perhaps you could think of doing a full feature on One Drive in W10. Thanks!
  • OneDrive lost Placeholders, but it got File Fetching back.  Also, it gained the Ability to be completely turned off.  You can Unlink the App from your Microsoft Account and Set it to not start up on boot.  That may be useful to some users who have small storage devices, but don't want OneDrive downloading several Gigabytes (potentially) of data to that device, but may still use it on thier Desktops or Laptops with larger storage volumes. The people who wanted Fetch back got it back.  
  • It's not all bad I might add, battery life seems a hell of a lot better under Windows 10 on my SP3. And switching to and from tablet mode is fantastic as well ()not that I do it that often, but I occasionally just watch Netflix in my room with the tablet, and that makes it easier to do), it definitely is a real boon for hybrid devices. In fact I actually sold a Lenovo tablet at work today with a dock which the guy bought specifically for that reason. It really does work as advertised, so if they can get the same thing in phones I think they're onto a real winner.
  • Excellent write-up!
  • The ugly.."nothing" I have to laugh. I love windows and everything it got but this is too much taken from Microsoft marketing dept. My opinion only but there's a lot of kiss a**ing here lately.
  • Can anyone tell me when is Windows 10 arriving on WIMBoot devices?
  • Installed it on my 32GB ASUS VivoTab 8 M81C last night shortly after midnight.
  • The installation process is dynamic and scales to whatever amount of space is available.
    I've just updated my Asus T100 which had a Wimboot installation.
  • Hi. Did you get an automatic update or did you use the official Media Creation Tool? I did it on my laptop using the Media Creation tool. Do I have to use the Media Creation tool on my tablet too?
  • Just installed on my SP3!! Oh dear!! W10 still feels really half-baked. Ok...I know about the major update due in Oct or thereabouts...but what I am concerned about is now. I hate to say this though....i think I prefer W8.1 better...both on my desktop mac