How to set up Reolink security camera on QNAP NAS

Reolink RLC-410
Reolink RLC-410 (Image credit: Rich Edmonds / Windows Central)

It's easy to configure a Reolink security camera to get it working on a QNAP network-attached storage (NAS) enclosure. With enough IP camera licenses available on your server, it's even possible to set up a Surveillance Station in but a few minutes. In this guide, I'll run you through the quick and painless process of adding Reolink cameras to your QNAP NAS.

Products used in this guide

  • A great value security camera: Reolink RLC-511W (opens in new tab) ($100 at Amazon)
  • Great NAS for surveillance: QNAP TS-251D (opens in new tab) ($299 at Amazon)
  1. Turn on your QNAP NAS.
  2. Make sure you've already connected your Reolink camera to your home network, and it's installed and ready for use.
  3. Launch your favorite browser on a PC to log into your QNAP NAS. (This is usually the IP address followed by port 80, e.g.: 192.168.1.15:80.)
  4. Open App Center.
  5. Install Surveillance Station.
  6. Launch Surveillance Station.
  7. Enter Settings.
  8. Click on the + on Camera 1.

QNAP Surveillance Station

Source: QNAP (Image credit: Source: QNAP)
  1. Enter all the details for the Reolink camera you're attempting to connect to.
  2. Hit Test to make sure it works.
  3. Click Next.
  4. You can now configure quality and recording settings or leave them default.
  5. Click Next.
  6. Here, we can set up schedules and more.
  7. Once finished, click Next.
  8. Confirm all the details and click Next to complete the process.

You'll now be able to control, manage, and set all kinds of settings for the newly added Reolink camera within the Surveillance Station. This software suite is expansive, allowing you to set up recordings, schedules, and more.

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Rich Edmonds
Senior Editor, PC Build

Rich Edmonds is Senior Editor of PC hardware at Windows Central, covering everything related to PC components and NAS. He's been involved in technology for more than a decade and knows a thing or two about the magic inside a PC chassis. You can follow him over on Twitter at @RichEdmonds.